ICD-10 Diagnosis Code Z83.5

Family history of eye and ear disorders

Diagnosis Code Z83.5

ICD-10: Z83.5
Short Description: Family history of eye and ear disorders
Long Description: Family history of eye and ear disorders
This is the 2017 version of the ICD-10-CM diagnosis code Z83.5

Code Classification
  • Factors influencing health status and contact with health services
    • Persons with potential health hazards related to family and personal history and certain conditions influencing health status (Z77-Z99)
      • Family history of other specific disorders (Z83)

Information for Patients

Ear Disorders

Your ear has three main parts: outer, middle and inner. You use all of them in hearing. Sound waves come in through your outer ear. They reach your middle ear, where they make your eardrum vibrate. The vibrations are transmitted through three tiny bones, called ossicles, in your middle ear. The vibrations travel to your inner ear, a snail-shaped organ. The inner ear makes the nerve impulses that are sent to the brain. Your brain recognizes them as sounds. The inner ear also controls balance.

A variety of conditions may affect your hearing or balance:

  • Ear infections are the most common illness in infants and young children.
  • Tinnitus, a roaring in your ears, can be the result of loud noises, medicines or a variety of other causes.
  • Meniere's disease may be the result of fluid problems in your inner ear; its symptoms include tinnitus and dizziness.
  • Ear barotrauma is an injury to your ear because of changes in barometric (air) or water pressure.

Some ear disorders can result in hearing disorders and deafness.

  • Aural polyps
  • Benign ear cyst or tumor
  • Ear discharge
  • Ear emergencies
  • Ear examination
  • Earache
  • Eardrum repair
  • Otosclerosis
  • Ruptured eardrum
  • Tympanometry
  • Wax blockage

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Eye Diseases

Some eye problems are minor and don't last long. But some can lead to a permanent loss of vision.

Common eye problems include

  • Refractive errors
  • Cataracts - clouded lenses
  • Glaucoma - a disorder caused by damage to the optic nerve
  • Retinal disorders - problems with the nerve layer at the back of the eye
  • Macular degeneration - a disease that destroys sharp, central vision
  • Diabetic eye problems
  • Conjunctivitis - an infection also known as pinkeye

Your best defense is to have regular checkups, because eye diseases do not always have symptoms. Early detection and treatment could prevent vision loss. See an eye care professional right away if you have a sudden change in vision, if everything looks dim, or if you see flashes of light. Other symptoms that need quick attention are pain, double vision, fluid coming from the eye, and inflammation.

NIH: National Eye Institute

  • Anisocoria
  • Chemosis
  • Choroidal dystrophies
  • Coloboma of the iris
  • Episcleritis
  • Eye and orbit ultrasound
  • Eye burning - itching and discharge
  • Eye pain
  • Eye redness
  • Fluorescein angiography
  • Fluorescein eye stain
  • Heterochromia
  • Ophthalmoscopy
  • Optic glioma
  • Optic nerve atrophy
  • Optic neuritis
  • Orbit CT scan
  • Orbital pseudotumor
  • Photophobia
  • Pinguecula
  • Pterygium
  • Pupil - white spots
  • Scleritis
  • Slit-lamp exam
  • Standard ophthalmic exam
  • Subconjunctival hemorrhage
  • Uveitis
  • Watery eyes

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Family History

Your family history includes health information about you and your close relatives. Families have many factors in common, including their genes, environment, and lifestyle. Looking at these factors can help you figure out whether you have a higher risk for certain health problems, such as heart disease, stroke, and cancer.

Having a family member with a disease raises your risk, but it does not mean that you will definitely get it. Knowing that you are at risk gives you a chance to reduce that risk by following a healthier lifestyle and getting tested as needed.

You can get started by talking to your relatives about their health. Draw a family tree and add the health information. Having copies of medical records and death certificates is also helpful.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

  • Family History Is Important for Your Health (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)

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