ICD-10 Diagnosis Code Z83.2

Family history of dis of the bld/bld-form org/immun mechnsm

Diagnosis Code Z83.2

ICD-10: Z83.2
Short Description: Family history of dis of the bld/bld-form org/immun mechnsm
Long Description: Family history of diseases of the blood and blood-forming organs and certain disorders involving the immune mechanism
This is the 2017 version of the ICD-10-CM diagnosis code Z83.2

Code Classification
  • Factors influencing health status and contact with health services
    • Persons with potential health hazards related to family and personal history and certain conditions influencing health status (Z77-Z99)
      • Family history of other specific disorders (Z83)

Information for Medical Professionals

Code Edits
The following edits are applicable to this code:
Unacceptable principal diagnosis Additional informationCallout TooltipUnacceptable principal diagnosis
There are selected codes that describe a circumstance which influences an individual’s health status but not a current illness or injury, or codes that are not specific manifestations but may be due to an underlying cause. These codes are considered unacceptable as a principal diagnosis.

Convert to ICD-9 Additional informationCallout TooltipGeneral Equivalence Map
The ICD-10 and ICD-9 GEMs are used to facilitate linking between the diagnosis codes in ICD-9-CM and the new ICD-10-CM code set. The GEMs are the raw material from which providers, health information vendors and payers can derive specific applied mappings to meet their needs.

Present on Admission (POA) Additional informationCallout TooltipPresent on Admission
The Present on Admission (POA) indicator is used for diagnosis codes included in claims involving inpatient admissions to general acute care hospitals. POA indicators must be reported to CMS on each claim to facilitate the grouping of diagnoses codes into the proper Diagnostic Related Groups (DRG). CMS publishes a listing of specific diagnosis codes that are exempt from the POA reporting requirement.

The code Z83.2 is exempt from POA reporting.

  • Family history of alpha thalassemia
  • Family history of antiphospholipid syndrome
  • Family history of antithrombin III deficiency
  • Family history of asplenia
  • Family history of beta thalassemia
  • Family history of blood coagulation disorder
  • Family history of factor V deficiency
  • Family history of Factor V Leiden mutation
  • Family history of hemoglobinopathy
  • Family history of hemoglobinopathy
  • Family history of hemoglobinopathy
  • Family history of hemoglobinopathy
  • Family history of hemophilia A
  • Family history of hypercoagulable state
  • Family history of pernicious anemia
  • Family history of polycythemia
  • Family history of protein C deficiency
  • Family history of protein S deficiency
  • Family history of rheumatic fever
  • Family history of sarcoidosis
  • Family history of sickle cell anemia
  • Family history of Von Willebrand disease
  • Family history: Anemia
  • Family history: Anemia
  • Family history: Anemia
  • Family history: Autoimmune disease
  • Family history: Blood disorder
  • Family history: Hemophilia
  • Family history: Hemophilia
  • Family history: Hereditary spherocytosis
  • Family history: Sickle cell trait
  • Family history: Spherocytosis
  • Family history: Thalassemia
  • Family history: Thalassemia
  • Family history: Thalassemia
  • Spouse hemophiliac

Index of Diseases and Injuries
References found for the code Z83.2 in the Index of Diseases and Injuries:

Information for Patients

Blood Disorders

Also called: Hematologic diseases

Your blood is living tissue made up of liquid and solids. The liquid part, called plasma, is made of water, salts and protein. Over half of your blood is plasma. The solid part of your blood contains red blood cells, white blood cells and platelets.

Blood disorders affect one or more parts of the blood and prevent your blood from doing its job. They can be acute or chronic. Many blood disorders are inherited. Other causes include other diseases, side effects of medicines, and a lack of certain nutrients in your diet.

Types of blood disorders include

  • Platelet disorders, excessive clotting, and bleeding problems, which affect how your blood clots
  • Anemia, which happens when your blood does not carry enough oxygen to the rest of your body
  • Cancers of the blood, such as leukemia and myeloma
  • Eosinophilic disorders, which are problems with one type of white blood cell.

  • Blood differential
  • Blood smear
  • CBC
  • Hematocrit
  • Hemoglobin
  • Low white blood cell count and cancer
  • RBC count
  • RBC indices
  • WBC count

[Read More]

Family History

Your family history includes health information about you and your close relatives. Families have many factors in common, including their genes, environment, and lifestyle. Looking at these factors can help you figure out whether you have a higher risk for certain health problems, such as heart disease, stroke, and cancer.

Having a family member with a disease raises your risk, but it does not mean that you will definitely get it. Knowing that you are at risk gives you a chance to reduce that risk by following a healthier lifestyle and getting tested as needed.

You can get started by talking to your relatives about their health. Draw a family tree and add the health information. Having copies of medical records and death certificates is also helpful.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

  • Family History Is Important for Your Health (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)

[Read More]

Immune System and Disorders

Your immune system is a complex network of cells, tissues, and organs that work together to defend against germs. It helps your body to recognize these "foreign" invaders. Then its job is to keep them out, or if it can't, to find and destroy them.

If your immune system cannot do its job, the results can be serious. Disorders of the immune system include

  • Allergy and asthma - immune responses to substances that are usually not harmful
  • Immune deficiency diseases - disorders in which the immune system is missing one or more of its parts
  • Autoimmune diseases - diseases causing your immune system to attack your own body's cells and tissues by mistake

NIH: National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

  • Agammaglobulinemia
  • Aging changes in immunity
  • Chronic granulomatous disease
  • Graft-versus-host disease
  • Histiocytosis
  • Hyperimmunoglobulin E syndrome
  • Immune response
  • Immunodeficiency disorders
  • Selective deficiency of IgA

[Read More]
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