ICD-10 Diagnosis Code Z82.2

Family history of deafness and hearing loss

Diagnosis Code Z82.2

ICD-10: Z82.2
Short Description: Family history of deafness and hearing loss
Long Description: Family history of deafness and hearing loss
This is the 2017 version of the ICD-10-CM diagnosis code Z82.2

Code Classification
  • Factors influencing health status and contact with health services
    • Persons with potential health hazards related to family and personal history and certain conditions influencing health status (Z77-Z99)
      • Fam hx of certain disabil & chr dis (leading to disablement) (Z82)

Information for Medical Professionals

Code Edits
The following edits are applicable to this code:
Unacceptable principal diagnosis Additional informationCallout TooltipUnacceptable principal diagnosis
There are selected codes that describe a circumstance which influences an individual’s health status but not a current illness or injury, or codes that are not specific manifestations but may be due to an underlying cause. These codes are considered unacceptable as a principal diagnosis.

Convert to ICD-9 Additional informationCallout TooltipGeneral Equivalence Map
The ICD-10 and ICD-9 GEMs are used to facilitate linking between the diagnosis codes in ICD-9-CM and the new ICD-10-CM code set. The GEMs are the raw material from which providers, health information vendors and payers can derive specific applied mappings to meet their needs.
  • V19.2 - Family hx-deafness

Present on Admission (POA) Additional informationCallout TooltipPresent on Admission
The Present on Admission (POA) indicator is used for diagnosis codes included in claims involving inpatient admissions to general acute care hospitals. POA indicators must be reported to CMS on each claim to facilitate the grouping of diagnoses codes into the proper Diagnostic Related Groups (DRG). CMS publishes a listing of specific diagnosis codes that are exempt from the POA reporting requirement.

The code Z82.2 is exempt from POA reporting.

  • Family history of hearing loss
  • Family history of hearing loss
  • Family history: Deafness
  • Family history: Father deaf

Index of Diseases and Injuries
References found for the code Z82.2 in the Index of Diseases and Injuries:

Information for Patients

Family History

Your family history includes health information about you and your close relatives. Families have many factors in common, including their genes, environment, and lifestyle. Looking at these factors can help you figure out whether you have a higher risk for certain health problems, such as heart disease, stroke, and cancer.

Having a family member with a disease raises your risk, but it does not mean that you will definitely get it. Knowing that you are at risk gives you a chance to reduce that risk by following a healthier lifestyle and getting tested as needed.

You can get started by talking to your relatives about their health. Draw a family tree and add the health information. Having copies of medical records and death certificates is also helpful.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

  • Family History Is Important for Your Health (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)

[Read More]

Hearing Disorders and Deafness

Also called: Hearing loss, Presbycusis

It's frustrating to be unable to hear well enough to enjoy talking with friends or family. Hearing disorders make it hard, but not impossible, to hear. They can often be helped. Deafness can keep you from hearing sound at all.

What causes hearing loss? Some possibilities are

  • Heredity
  • Diseases such as ear infections and meningitis
  • Trauma
  • Certain medicines
  • Long-term exposure to loud noise
  • Aging

There are two main types of hearing loss. One happens when your inner ear or auditory nerve is damaged. This type is usually permanent. The other kind happens when sound waves cannot reach your inner ear. Earwax build-up, fluid, or a punctured eardrum can cause it. Treatment or surgery can often reverse this kind of hearing loss.

Untreated, hearing problems can get worse. If you have trouble hearing, you can get help. Possible treatments include hearing aids, cochlear implants, special training, certain medicines, and surgery.

NIH: National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders

  • Acoustic trauma
  • Age-related hearing loss
  • Audiometry
  • Ear examination
  • Hearing loss
  • Occupational hearing loss
  • Otosclerosis
  • Sensorineural deafness

[Read More]
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