ICD-10 Diagnosis Code Z77.123

Cntct w & expsr to radon & oth naturally occuring radiation

Diagnosis Code Z77.123

ICD-10: Z77.123
Short Description: Cntct w & expsr to radon & oth naturally occuring radiation
Long Description: Contact with and (suspected) exposure to radon and other naturally occuring radiation
This is the 2017 version of the ICD-10-CM diagnosis code Z77.123

Code Classification
  • Factors influencing health status and contact with health services
    • Persons with potential health hazards related to family and personal history and certain conditions influencing health status (Z77-Z99)
      • Oth contact w and (suspected) exposures hazardous to health (Z77)

Information for Medical Professionals

Code Edits
The following edits are applicable to this code:
Unacceptable principal diagnosis Additional informationCallout TooltipUnacceptable principal diagnosis
There are selected codes that describe a circumstance which influences an individual’s health status but not a current illness or injury, or codes that are not specific manifestations but may be due to an underlying cause. These codes are considered unacceptable as a principal diagnosis.

Convert to ICD-9 Additional informationCallout TooltipGeneral Equivalence Map
The ICD-10 and ICD-9 GEMs are used to facilitate linking between the diagnosis codes in ICD-9-CM and the new ICD-10-CM code set. The GEMs are the raw material from which providers, health information vendors and payers can derive specific applied mappings to meet their needs.

Present on Admission (POA) Additional informationCallout TooltipPresent on Admission
The Present on Admission (POA) indicator is used for diagnosis codes included in claims involving inpatient admissions to general acute care hospitals. POA indicators must be reported to CMS on each claim to facilitate the grouping of diagnoses codes into the proper Diagnostic Related Groups (DRG). CMS publishes a listing of specific diagnosis codes that are exempt from the POA reporting requirement.

The code Z77.123 is exempt from POA reporting.

  • Exposure to radiation

Index of Diseases and Injuries
References found for the code Z77.123 in the Index of Diseases and Injuries:

Information for Patients

Radiation Exposure

Radiation is energy that travels in the form of waves or high-speed particles. It occurs naturally in sunlight. Man-made radiation is used in X-rays, nuclear weapons, nuclear power plants and cancer treatment.

If you are exposed to small amounts of radiation over a long time, it raises your risk of cancer. It can also cause mutations in your genes, which you could pass on to any children you have after the exposure. A lot of radiation over a short period, such as from a radiation emergency, can cause burns or radiation sickness. Symptoms of radiation sickness include nausea, weakness, hair loss, skin burns and reduced organ function. If the exposure is large enough, it can cause premature aging or even death. You may be able to take medicine to reduce the radioactive material in your body.

Environmental Protection Agency

  • Radiation sickness

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You can't see radon. And you can't smell it or taste it. But it may be a problem in your home. Radon comes from the natural breakdown of uranium in soil, rock, and water. Radon is the second leading cause of lung cancer in the United States.

There are low levels of radon outdoors. Indoors, there can be high levels. Radon can enter homes and buildings through cracks in floors, walls, or foundations. Radon can also be in your water, especially well water. Testing is the only way to know if your home has elevated radon levels. It is inexpensive and easy. You can buy a test kit at most hardware stores or hire someone to do a test. Radon reduction systems can bring the amount of radon down to a safe level. The cost depends on the size and design of your home.

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