ICD-10 Diagnosis Code Z57.39

Occupational exposure to other air contaminants

Diagnosis Code Z57.39

ICD-10: Z57.39
Short Description: Occupational exposure to other air contaminants
Long Description: Occupational exposure to other air contaminants
This is the 2017 version of the ICD-10-CM diagnosis code Z57.39

Code Classification
  • Factors influencing health status and contact with health services
    • Persons with potential health hazards related to socioeconomic and psychosocial circumstances (Z55-Z65)
      • Occupational exposure to risk factors (Z57)

Information for Patients

Indoor Air Pollution

We usually think of air pollution as being outdoors, but the air in your house or office could also be polluted. Sources of indoor pollution include

  • Mold and pollen
  • Tobacco smoke
  • Household products and pesticides
  • Gases such as radon and carbon monoxide
  • Materials used in the building such as asbestos, formaldehyde and lead

Sometimes a group of people have symptoms that seem to be linked to time spent in a certain building. There may be a specific cause, such as Legionnaire's disease. Sometimes the cause of the illness cannot be found. This is known as sick building syndrome.

Usually indoor air quality problems only cause discomfort. Most people feel better as soon as they remove the source of the pollution. However, some pollutants can cause diseases that show up much later, such as respiratory diseases or cancer.

Making sure that your building is well-ventilated and getting rid of pollutants can improve the quality of your indoor air.

Environmental Protection Agency

[Read More]

Occupational Health

Occupational health problems occur at work or because of the kind of work you do. These problems can include

  • Cuts, broken bones, sprains, and strains
  • Loss of limbs
  • Repetitive motion disorders
  • Hearing problems caused by exposure to noise
  • Vision problems
  • Illness caused by breathing, touching, or swallowing unsafe substances
  • Illness caused by exposure to radiation
  • Exposure to germs in health care settings

Good job safety and prevention practices can reduce your risk of these problems. Try to stay fit, reduce stress, set up your work area properly, and use the right equipment and gear.

  • Back pain - returning to work
  • Occupational asthma
  • Occupational hearing loss
  • Pregnancy and work
  • Protecting Yourself from Heat Stress (National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health)

[Read More]
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