ICD-10 Diagnosis Code Z48.3

Aftercare following surgery for neoplasm

Diagnosis Code Z48.3

ICD-10: Z48.3
Short Description: Aftercare following surgery for neoplasm
Long Description: Aftercare following surgery for neoplasm
This is the 2017 version of the ICD-10-CM diagnosis code Z48.3

Valid for Submission
The code Z48.3 is valid for submission for HIPAA-covered transactions.

Code Classification
  • Factors influencing health status and contact with health services (Z00–Z99)
    • Encounters for other specific health care (Z40-Z53)
      • Encounter for other postprocedural aftercare (Z48)

Information for Patients


After Surgery

Also called: Postoperative care, Recovery from surgery

After any operation, you'll have some side effects. There is usually some pain with surgery. There may also be swelling and soreness around the area that the surgeon cut. Your surgeon can tell you which side effects to expect.

There can also be complications. These are unplanned events linked to the operation. Some complications are infection, too much bleeding, reaction to anesthesia, or accidental injury. Some people have a greater risk of complications because of other medical conditions.

Your surgeon can tell you how you might feel and what you will be able to do - or not do - the first few days, weeks, or months after surgery. Some other questions to ask are

  • How long you will be in the hospital
  • What kind of supplies, equipment, and help you might need when you go home
  • When you can go back to work
  • When it is ok to start exercising again
  • Are they any other restrictions in your activities

Following your surgeon's advice can help you recover as soon as possible.

Agency for Healthcare Quality and Research

  • Bland diet (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Deep breathing after surgery (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Diet - clear liquid (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Diet - full liquid (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Getting your home ready - after the hospital (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Indwelling catheter care (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Post surgical pain treatment - adults (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Self catheterization - female (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Self catheterization - male (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Suprapubic catheter care (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Surgical wound care -- closed (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Surgical wound infection - treatment (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Urinary catheters (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Urine drainage bags (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Using an incentive spirometer (Medical Encyclopedia)


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Cancer

Also called: Carcinoma, Malignancy, Neoplasms, Tumor

Cancer begins in your cells, which are the building blocks of your body. Normally, your body forms new cells as you need them, replacing old cells that die. Sometimes this process goes wrong. New cells grow even when you don't need them, and old cells don't die when they should. These extra cells can form a mass called a tumor. Tumors can be benign or malignant. Benign tumors aren't cancer while malignant ones are. Cells from malignant tumors can invade nearby tissues. They can also break away and spread to other parts of the body.

Cancer is not just one disease but many diseases. There are more than 100 different types of cancer. Most cancers are named for where they start. For example, lung cancer starts in the lung, and breast cancer starts in the breast. The spread of cancer from one part of the body to another is called metastasis. Symptoms and treatment depend on the cancer type and how advanced it is. Most treatment plans may include surgery, radiation and/or chemotherapy. Some may involve hormone therapy, immunotherapy or other types of biologic therapy, or stem cell transplantation.

NIH: National Cancer Institute

  • Cancer (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Cancer and lymph nodes (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Cancer treatment -- early menopause (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Cancer treatment: preventing infection (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Cancer treatments (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • How to research cancer (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • How to tell your child that you have cancer (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Hyperthermia for treating cancer (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Laser therapy for cancer (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Photodynamic therapy for cancer (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Targeted therapies for cancer (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Understanding your cancer prognosis (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Your cancer care team (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Your cancer diagnosis: Do you need a second opinion? (Medical Encyclopedia)


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