ICD-10 Diagnosis Code T80.61XA

Oth serum reaction due to admin blood/products, init

Diagnosis Code T80.61XA

ICD-10: T80.61XA
Short Description: Oth serum reaction due to admin blood/products, init
Long Description: Other serum reaction due to administration of blood and blood products, initial encounter
This is the 2017 version of the ICD-10-CM diagnosis code T80.61XA

Code Classification
  • Injury, poisoning and certain other consequences of external causes
    • Complications of surgical and medical care, not elsewhere classified (T80-T88)
      • Comp following infusion, transfusion and theraputc injection (T80)

Information for Patients

Blood Transfusion and Donation

Every year, millions of people in the United States receive life-saving blood transfusions. During a transfusion, you receive whole blood or parts of blood such as

  • Red blood cells - cells that carry oxygen to and from tissues and organs
  • Platelets - cells that form clots to control bleeding
  • Plasma - the liquid part of the blood that helps clotting. You may need it if you have been badly burned, have liver failure or a severe infection.

Most blood transfusions go very smoothly. Some infectious agents, such as HIV, can survive in blood and infect the person receiving the blood transfusion. To keep blood safe, blood banks carefully screen donated blood. The risk of catching a virus from a blood transfusion is low.

Sometimes it is possible to have a transfusion of your own blood. During surgery, you may need a blood transfusion because of blood loss. If you are having a surgery that you're able to schedule months in advance, your doctor may ask whether you would like to use your own blood, instead of donated blood. If so, you will need to have blood drawn one or more times before the surgery. A blood bank will store your blood for your use.

NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

  • Blood donation before surgery
  • Blood transfusions

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Drug Reactions

Also called: Side effects

Most of the time, medicines make our lives better. They reduce aches and pains, fight infections, and control problems such as high blood pressure or diabetes. But medicines can also cause unwanted reactions.

One problem is interactions, which may occur between

  • Two drugs, such as aspirin and blood thinners
  • Drugs and food, such as statins and grapefruit
  • Drugs and supplements, such as gingko and blood thinners
  • Drugs and diseases, such as aspirin and peptic ulcers

Interactions can change the actions of one or both drugs. The drugs might not work, or you could get side effects.

Side effects are unwanted effects caused by the drugs. Most are mild, such as a stomach aches or drowsiness, and go away after you stop taking the drug. Others can be more serious.

Drug allergies are another type of reaction. They can be mild or life-threatening. Skin reactions, such as hives and rashes, are the most common type. Anaphylaxis, a serious allergic reaction, is more rare.

When you start a new prescription or over-the-counter medication, make sure you understand how to take it correctly. Know which other medications and foods you need to avoid. Ask your health care provider or pharmacist if you have questions.

  • Angioedema
  • Drug allergies
  • Drug-induced diarrhea
  • Drug-induced tremor
  • Taking multiple medicines safely

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