ICD-10 Diagnosis Code T80.41

Rh incompatibility with hemolytic transfusion reaction

Diagnosis Code T80.41

ICD-10: T80.41
Short Description: Rh incompatibility with hemolytic transfusion reaction
Long Description: Rh incompatibility with hemolytic transfusion reaction
This is the 2017 version of the ICD-10-CM diagnosis code T80.41

Code Classification
  • Injury, poisoning and certain other consequences of external causes
    • Complications of surgical and medical care, not elsewhere classified (T80-T88)
      • Comp following infusion, transfusion and theraputc injection (T80)

Information for Patients

Blood Transfusion and Donation

Every year, millions of people in the United States receive life-saving blood transfusions. During a transfusion, you receive whole blood or parts of blood such as

  • Red blood cells - cells that carry oxygen to and from tissues and organs
  • Platelets - cells that form clots to control bleeding
  • Plasma - the liquid part of the blood that helps clotting. You may need it if you have been badly burned, have liver failure or a severe infection.

Most blood transfusions go very smoothly. Some infectious agents, such as HIV, can survive in blood and infect the person receiving the blood transfusion. To keep blood safe, blood banks carefully screen donated blood. The risk of catching a virus from a blood transfusion is low.

Sometimes it is possible to have a transfusion of your own blood. During surgery, you may need a blood transfusion because of blood loss. If you are having a surgery that you're able to schedule months in advance, your doctor may ask whether you would like to use your own blood, instead of donated blood. If so, you will need to have blood drawn one or more times before the surgery. A blood bank will store your blood for your use.

NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

  • Blood donation before surgery
  • Blood transfusions

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Rh Incompatibility

There are four major blood types: A, B, O, and AB. The types are based on substances on the surface of the blood cells. Another blood type is called Rh. Rh factor is a protein on red blood cells. Most people are Rh-positive; they have Rh factor. Rh-negative people don't have it. Rh factor is inherited though genes.

When you're pregnant, blood from your baby can cross into your bloodstream, especially during delivery. If you're Rh-negative and your baby is Rh-positive, your body will react to the baby's blood as a foreign substance. It will create antibodies (proteins) against the baby's blood. These antibodies usually don't cause problems during a first pregnancy.

But Rh incompatibility may cause problems in later pregnancies, if the baby is Rh-positive. This is because the antibodies stay in your body once they have formed. The antibodies can cross the placenta and attack the baby's red blood cells. The baby could get Rh disease, a serious condition that can cause a serious type of anemia.

Blood tests can tell whether you have Rh factor and whether your body has made antibodies. Injections of a medicine called Rh immune globulin can keep your body from making Rh antibodies. It helps prevent the problems of Rh incompatibility. If treatment is needed for the baby, it can include supplements to help the body to make red blood cells and blood transfusions.

NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

  • Fetal-maternal erythrocyte distribution
  • Hemolytic disease of the newborn
  • Rh incompatibility

[Read More]
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