ICD-10 Diagnosis Code T80.30XS

ABO incompat react due to tranfs of bld/bld prod, unsp, sqla

Diagnosis Code T80.30XS

ICD-10: T80.30XS
Short Description: ABO incompat react due to tranfs of bld/bld prod, unsp, sqla
Long Description: ABO incompatibility reaction due to transfusion of blood or blood products, unspecified, sequela
This is the 2018 version of the ICD-10-CM diagnosis code T80.30XS

Valid for Submission
The code T80.30XS is valid for submission for HIPAA-covered transactions.

Code Classification
  • Injury, poisoning and certain other consequences of external causes (S00–T98)
    • Complications of surgical and medical care, not elsewhere classified (T80-T88)
      • Comp following infusion, transfusion and theraputc injection (T80)

Information for Medical Professionals

Diagnostic Related Groups
The diagnosis code T80.30XS is grouped in the following Diagnostic Related Group(s) (MS-DRG V34.0)

  • 922 - OTHER INJURY, POISONING AND TOXIC EFFECT DIAGNOSES WITH MCC
  • 923 - OTHER INJURY, POISONING AND TOXIC EFFECT DIAGNOSES WITHOUT MCC

Convert to ICD-9 Additional informationCallout TooltipGeneral Equivalence Map
The ICD-10 and ICD-9 GEMs are used to facilitate linking between the diagnosis codes in ICD-9-CM and the new ICD-10-CM code set. The GEMs are the raw material from which providers, health information vendors and payers can derive specific applied mappings to meet their needs.

Present on Admission (POA) Additional informationCallout TooltipPresent on Admission
The Present on Admission (POA) indicator is used for diagnosis codes included in claims involving inpatient admissions to general acute care hospitals. POA indicators must be reported to CMS on each claim to facilitate the grouping of diagnoses codes into the proper Diagnostic Related Groups (DRG). CMS publishes a listing of specific diagnosis codes that are exempt from the POA reporting requirement.

The code T80.30XS is exempt from POA reporting.

Synonyms
  • ABO incompatibility reaction
  • Transfusion reaction caused by anti A
  • Transfusion reaction caused by anti B
  • Transfusion reaction due to isoantibody
  • Transfusion reaction due to isoantibody
  • Transfusion reaction due to isoantibody

Information for Patients


Blood Transfusion and Donation

Every year, millions of people in the United States receive life-saving blood transfusions. During a transfusion, you receive whole blood or parts of blood such as

  • Red blood cells - cells that carry oxygen to and from tissues and organs
  • Platelets - cells that form clots to control bleeding
  • Plasma - the liquid part of the blood that helps clotting. You may need it if you have been badly burned, have liver failure or a severe infection.

Most blood transfusions go very smoothly. Some infectious agents, such as HIV, can survive in blood and infect the person receiving the blood transfusion. To keep blood safe, blood banks carefully screen donated blood. The risk of catching a virus from a blood transfusion is low.

Sometimes it is possible to have a transfusion of your own blood. During surgery, you may need a blood transfusion because of blood loss. If you are having a surgery that you're able to schedule months in advance, your doctor may ask whether you would like to use your own blood, instead of donated blood. If so, you will need to have blood drawn one or more times before the surgery. A blood bank will store your blood for your use.

NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

  • Blood donation before surgery (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Blood transfusions (Medical Encyclopedia)


[Read More]
Previous Code
Previous Code T80.30XD
Next Code
T80.31 Next Code