ICD-10 Diagnosis Code T40.8X

Poisoning by and adverse effect of lysergide [LSD]

Diagnosis Code T40.8X

ICD-10: T40.8X
Short Description: Poisoning by and adverse effect of lysergide [LSD]
Long Description: Poisoning by and adverse effect of lysergide [LSD]
This is the 2017 version of the ICD-10-CM diagnosis code T40.8X

Code Classification
  • Injury, poisoning and certain other consequences of external causes
    • Poisoning by, adverse effect of and underdosing of drugs, medicaments and biological substances (T36-T50)
      • Narcotics and psychodysleptics (T40)

Information for Patients

Club Drugs

Club drugs are group of psychoactive drugs. They act on the central nervous system and can cause changes in mood, awareness, and how you act. These drugs are often abused by young adults at all-night dance parties, dance clubs, and bars. They include

  • Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA), also known as Ecstasy XTC, X, E, Adam, Molly, Hug Beans, and Love Drug
  • Gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB), also known as G, Liquid Ecstasy, and Soap
  • Ketamine, also known as Special K, K, Vitamin K, and Jet
  • Rohypnol, also known as Roofies
  • Methamphetamine, also known as Speed, Ice, Chalk, Meth, Crystal, Crank, and Glass
  • Lysergic Acid Diethylamide (LSD), also known as Acid, Blotter, and Dots

Some of these drugs are approved for certain medical uses. Other uses of these drugs are abuse.

Club drugs are also sometimes used as "date rape" drugs, to make someone unable to say no to or fight back against sexual assault. Abusing these drugs can cause serious health problems and sometimes death. They are even more dangerous if you use them with alcohol.

NIH: National Institute on Drug Abuse

  • Substance use -- amphetamines
  • Substance use -- LSD
  • Substance use -- phencyclidine (PCP)
  • Tips for Teens: The Truth about Club Drugs (Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration)

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Drug Reactions

Also called: Side effects

Most of the time, medicines make our lives better. They reduce aches and pains, fight infections, and control problems such as high blood pressure or diabetes. But medicines can also cause unwanted reactions.

One problem is interactions, which may occur between

  • Two drugs, such as aspirin and blood thinners
  • Drugs and food, such as statins and grapefruit
  • Drugs and supplements, such as gingko and blood thinners
  • Drugs and diseases, such as aspirin and peptic ulcers

Interactions can change the actions of one or both drugs. The drugs might not work, or you could get side effects.

Side effects are unwanted effects caused by the drugs. Most are mild, such as a stomach aches or drowsiness, and go away after you stop taking the drug. Others can be more serious.

Drug allergies are another type of reaction. They can be mild or life-threatening. Skin reactions, such as hives and rashes, are the most common type. Anaphylaxis, a serious allergic reaction, is more rare.

When you start a new prescription or over-the-counter medication, make sure you understand how to take it correctly. Know which other medications and foods you need to avoid. Ask your health care provider or pharmacist if you have questions.

  • Angioedema
  • Drug allergies
  • Drug-induced diarrhea
  • Drug-induced tremor
  • Taking multiple medicines safely

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