ICD-10 Diagnosis Code T38.903

Poisoning by unspecified hormone antagonists, assault

Diagnosis Code T38.903

ICD-10: T38.903
Short Description: Poisoning by unspecified hormone antagonists, assault
Long Description: Poisoning by unspecified hormone antagonists, assault
This is the 2018 version of the ICD-10-CM diagnosis code T38.903

Not Valid for Submission
The code T38.903 is a "header" and not valid for submission for HIPAA-covered transactions.

Code Classification
  • Injury, poisoning and certain other consequences of external causes (S00–T98)
    • Poisoning by, adverse effect of and underdosing of drugs, medicaments and biological substances (T36-T50)
      • Hormones and their synthetic substitutes and antag, NEC (T38)

Table of Drugs and Chemicals

The code T38.903 is included in the Table of Drugs and Chemicals, this table contains a classification of drugs, industrial solvents, corrosive gases, noxious plants, pesticides, and other toxic agents. Each substance in the table is assigned a code according to the poisoning classification and external causes of adverse effects. Use as many codes as necessary to describe all reported drugs, medicinal or chemical substances.

Substance Poisoning
Accidental
(unintentional)
Poisoning
Accidental
self-harm
Poisoning
Assault
Poisoning
Undetermined
Adverse
effect
Underdosing
Gonadal tissue extractT38.901T38.902T38.903T38.904T38.905T38.906
Gonadal tissue extract
  »female
T38.901T38.902T38.903T38.904T38.905T38.906
Gonadal tissue extract
  »male
T38.901T38.902T38.903T38.904T38.905T38.906

Information for Patients


Hormones

Hormones are your body's chemical messengers. They travel in your bloodstream to tissues or organs. They work slowly, over time, and affect many different processes, including

  • Growth and development
  • Metabolism - how your body gets energy from the foods you eat
  • Sexual function
  • Reproduction
  • Mood

Endocrine glands, which are special groups of cells, make hormones. The major endocrine glands are the pituitary, pineal, thymus, thyroid, adrenal glands, and pancreas. In addition, men produce hormones in their testes and women produce them in their ovaries.

Hormones are powerful. It takes only a tiny amount to cause big changes in cells or even your whole body. That is why too much or too little of a certain hormone can be serious. Laboratory tests can measure the hormone levels in your blood, urine, or saliva. Your health care provider may perform these tests if you have symptoms of a hormone disorder. Home pregnancy tests are similar - they test for pregnancy hormones in your urine.

  • Could you have low testosterone? (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Growth hormone test (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Luteinizing hormone (LH) blood test (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Prolactin blood test (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Serum progesterone (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Testosterone (Medical Encyclopedia)


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Poisoning

A poison is any substance that is harmful to your body. You might swallow it, inhale it, inject it, or absorb it through your skin. Any substance can be poisonous if too much is taken. Poisons can include

  • Prescription or over-the-counter medicines taken in doses that are too high
  • Overdoses of illegal drugs
  • Carbon monoxide from gas appliances
  • Household products, such as laundry powder or furniture polish
  • Pesticides
  • Indoor or outdoor plants
  • Metals such as lead and mercury

The effects of poisoning range from short-term illness to brain damage, coma, and death. To prevent poisoning it is important to use and store products exactly as their labels say. Keep dangerous products where children can't get to them. Treatment for poisoning depends on the type of poison. If you suspect someone has been poisoned, call your local poison control center at 1-800-222-1222 right away.

  • Poisoning (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Poisoning first aid (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Toxicology screen (Medical Encyclopedia)


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