ICD-10 Diagnosis Code S92.021B

Disp fx of anterior process of r calcaneus, init for opn fx

Diagnosis Code S92.021B

ICD-10: S92.021B
Short Description: Disp fx of anterior process of r calcaneus, init for opn fx
Long Description: Displaced fracture of anterior process of right calcaneus, initial encounter for open fracture
This is the 2017 version of the ICD-10-CM diagnosis code S92.021B

Valid for Submission
The code S92.021B is valid for submission for HIPAA-covered transactions.

Code Classification
  • Injury, poisoning and certain other consequences of external causes (S00–T98)
    • Injuries to the ankle and foot (S90-S99)
      • Fracture of foot and toe, except ankle (S92)

Information for Medical Professionals

Diagnostic Related Groups
The diagnosis code S92.021B is grouped in the following Diagnostic Related Group(s) (MS-DRG V34.0)

  • 562 - FRACTURE SPRAIN, STRAIN AND DISLOCATION EXCEPT FEMUR, HIP, PELVIS AND THIGH WITH MCC
  • 563 - FRACTURE SPRAIN, STRAIN AND DISLOCATION EXCEPT FEMUR, HIP, PELVIS AND THIGH WITHOUT MCC

Information for Patients


Fractures

Also called: Broken bone

A fracture is a break, usually in a bone. If the broken bone punctures the skin, it is called an open or compound fracture. Fractures commonly happen because of car accidents, falls, or sports injuries. Other causes are low bone density and osteoporosis, which cause weakening of the bones. Overuse can cause stress fractures, which are very small cracks in the bone.

Symptoms of a fracture are

  • Intense pain
  • Deformity - the limb looks out of place
  • Swelling, bruising, or tenderness around the injury
  • Numbness and tingling
  • Problems moving a limb

You need to get medical care right away for any fracture. An x-ray can tell if your bone is broken. You may need to wear a cast or splint. Sometimes you need surgery to put in plates, pins or screws to keep the bone in place.

  • Ankle fracture - aftercare (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Broken bone (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Broken collarbone - aftercare (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Closed reduction of a fractured bone (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Closed reduction of a fractured bone - aftercare (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Hand fracture - aftercare (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Metatarsal fracture (acute) - aftercare (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Metatarsal stress fractures - aftercare (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Radial head fracture - aftercare (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • What Are Growth Plate Injuries? - NIH (National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases)


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Heel Injuries and Disorders

Heel problems are common and can be painful. Often, they result from too much stress on your heel bone and the tissues that surround it. That stress can come from

  • Injuries
  • Bruises that you get walking, running or jumping
  • Wearing shoes that don't fit or aren't made well
  • Being overweight

These can lead to tendinitis, bursitis, and fasciitis, which are all types of inflammation of the tissues that surround your heel. Over time the stress can cause bone spurs and deformities. Certain diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis and gout, can also lead to heel problems. Treatments for heel problems might include rest, medicines, exercises, taping, and special shoes. Surgery is rarely needed.

  • Achilles tendinitis (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Achilles tendon repair (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Achilles tendon rupture - aftercare (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Bursitis of the heel (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Heel pain (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Heel pain and Achilles tendonitis -- aftercare (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Plantar fasciitis (Medical Encyclopedia)


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