ICD-10 Diagnosis Code S83.289S

Oth tear of lat mensc, current injury, unsp knee, sequela

Diagnosis Code S83.289S

ICD-10: S83.289S
Short Description: Oth tear of lat mensc, current injury, unsp knee, sequela
Long Description: Other tear of lateral meniscus, current injury, unspecified knee, sequela
This is the 2017 version of the ICD-10-CM diagnosis code S83.289S

Valid for Submission
The code S83.289S is valid for submission for HIPAA-covered transactions.

Code Classification
  • Injury, poisoning and certain other consequences of external causes (S00–T98)
    • Injuries to the knee and lower leg (S80-S89)
      • Dislocation and sprain of joints and ligaments of knee (S83)

Information for Medical Professionals

Diagnostic Related Groups
The diagnosis code S83.289S is grouped in the following Diagnostic Related Group(s) (MS-DRG V34.0)

  • 562 - FRACTURE SPRAIN, STRAIN AND DISLOCATION EXCEPT FEMUR, HIP, PELVIS AND THIGH WITH MCC
  • 563 - FRACTURE SPRAIN, STRAIN AND DISLOCATION EXCEPT FEMUR, HIP, PELVIS AND THIGH WITHOUT MCC

Present on Admission (POA) Additional informationCallout TooltipPresent on Admission
The Present on Admission (POA) indicator is used for diagnosis codes included in claims involving inpatient admissions to general acute care hospitals. POA indicators must be reported to CMS on each claim to facilitate the grouping of diagnoses codes into the proper Diagnostic Related Groups (DRG). CMS publishes a listing of specific diagnosis codes that are exempt from the POA reporting requirement.

The code S83.289S is exempt from POA reporting.

Synonyms
  • Acute meniscal tear, lateral
  • Acute meniscal tear, lateral, anterior horn
  • Acute meniscal tear, lateral, horizontal cleavage
  • Acute meniscal tear, lateral, peripheral detachment
  • Acute meniscal tear, lateral, posterior horn
  • Acute meniscal tear, lateral, radial
  • Current tear of lateral cartilage AND/OR meniscus of knee
  • Dislocated knee with lateral meniscus tear
  • Multiple tears of lateral meniscus
  • Radial tear of lateral meniscus
  • Tear of lateral meniscus of knee

Information for Patients


Cartilage Disorders

Cartilage is the tough but flexible tissue that covers the ends of your bones at a joint. It also gives shape and support to other parts of your body, such as your ears, nose and windpipe. Healthy cartilage helps you move by allowing your bones to glide over each other. It also protects bones by preventing them from rubbing against each other.

Injured, inflamed, or damaged cartilage can cause symptoms such as pain and limited movement. It can also lead to joint damage and deformity. Causes of cartilage problems include

  • Tears and injuries, such as sports injuries
  • Genetic factors
  • Other disorders, such as some types of arthritis

Osteoarthritis results from breakdown of cartilage.

NIH: National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases

  • Costochondritis (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Meniscus tears -- aftercare (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Pectus carinatum (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Pectus excavatum (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Perichondritis (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • What Are Growth Plate Injuries? - NIH (National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases)


[Read More]

Knee Injuries and Disorders

Your knee joint is made up of bone, cartilage, ligaments and fluid. Muscles and tendons help the knee joint move. When any of these structures is hurt or diseased, you have knee problems. Knee problems can cause pain and difficulty walking.

Knee problems are very common, and they occur in people of all ages. Knee problems can interfere with many things, from participation in sports to simply getting up from a chair and walking. This can have a big impact on your life.

The most common disease affecting the knee is osteoarthritis. The cartilage in the knee gradually wears away, causing pain and swelling.

Injuries to ligaments and tendons also cause knee problems. A common injury is to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). You usually injure your ACL by a sudden twisting motion. ACL and other knee injuries are common sports injuries.

Treatment of knee problems depends on the cause. In some cases your doctor may recommend knee replacement.

NIH: National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases

  • ACL reconstruction (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Anterior crucate ligament (ACL) injury (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury -- aftercare (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Anterior knee pain (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Baker cyst (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Broken kneecap - aftercare (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Collateral ligament (CL) injury -- aftercare (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Getting your home ready - knee or hip surgery (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Knee arthroscopy (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Knee MRI scan (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Knee pain (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Meniscus tears -- aftercare (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Osgood-Schlatter disease (Medical Encyclopedia)


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