ICD-10 Diagnosis Code S36.00XA

Unspecified injury of spleen, initial encounter

Diagnosis Code S36.00XA

ICD-10: S36.00XA
Short Description: Unspecified injury of spleen, initial encounter
Long Description: Unspecified injury of spleen, initial encounter
This is the 2017 version of the ICD-10-CM diagnosis code S36.00XA

Valid for Submission
The code S36.00XA is valid for submission for HIPAA-covered transactions.

Code Classification
  • Injury, poisoning and certain other consequences of external causes (S00–T98)
    • Injuries to the abdomen, lower back, lumbar spine, pelvis and external genitals (S30-S39)
      • Injury of intra-abdominal organs (S36)

Information for Medical Professionals

Synonyms
  • Closed injury of spleen
  • Immune system complication of procedure
  • Injury of spleen
  • Injury of spleen during surgery
  • Injury of spleen with open wound into abdominal cavity
  • Injury of spleen without open wound into abdominal cavity
  • Open injury of spleen

Information for Patients


Spleen Diseases

Also called: Splenic diseases

Your spleen is an organ above your stomach and under your ribs on your left side. It is about as big as your fist. The spleen is part of your lymphatic system, which fights infection and keeps your body fluids in balance. It contains white blood cells that fight germs. Your spleen also helps control the amount of blood in your body, and destroys old and damaged cells.

Certain diseases might cause your spleen to swell. You can also damage or rupture your spleen in an injury, especially if it is already swollen. If your spleen is too damaged, you might need surgery to remove it. You can live without a spleen. Other organs, such as your liver, will take over some of the spleen's work. Without a spleen, however, your body will lose some of its ability to fight infections.

  • Hypersplenism (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Spleen removal (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Spleen removal - laparoscopic - adults - discharge (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Spleen removal - open - adults - discharge (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Splenomegaly (Medical Encyclopedia)


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Wounds and Injuries

Also called: Traumatic injuries

An injury is damage to your body. It is a general term that refers to harm caused by accidents, falls, hits, weapons, and more. In the U.S., millions of people injure themselves every year. These injuries range from minor to life-threatening. Injuries can happen at work or play, indoors or outdoors, driving a car, or walking across the street.

Wounds are injuries that break the skin or other body tissues. They include cuts, scrapes, scratches, and punctured skin. They often happen because of an accident, but surgery, sutures, and stitches also cause wounds. Minor wounds usually aren't serious, but it is important to clean them. Serious and infected wounds may require first aid followed by a visit to your doctor. You should also seek attention if the wound is deep, you cannot close it yourself, you cannot stop the bleeding or get the dirt out, or it does not heal.

Other common types of injuries include

  • Animal bites
  • Bruises
  • Burns
  • Dislocations
  • Electrical injuries
  • Fractures
  • Sprains and strains

  • Bleeding (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Crush injury (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Cuts and puncture wounds (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Electrical injury (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Gunshot wounds -- aftercare (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • How wounds heal (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Laceration - sutures or staples - at home (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Lacerations - liquid bandage (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Surgical wound care (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Surgical wound infection - treatment (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Wet to dry dressing changes (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Wound care centers (Medical Encyclopedia)


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