ICD-10 Diagnosis Code S04.72XD

Injury of accessory nerve, left side, subsequent encounter

Diagnosis Code S04.72XD

ICD-10: S04.72XD
Short Description: Injury of accessory nerve, left side, subsequent encounter
Long Description: Injury of accessory nerve, left side, subsequent encounter
This is the 2018 version of the ICD-10-CM diagnosis code S04.72XD

Valid for Submission
The code S04.72XD is valid for submission for HIPAA-covered transactions.

Code Classification
  • Injury, poisoning and certain other consequences of external causes (S00–T98)
    • Injuries to the head (S00-S09)
      • Injury of cranial nerve (S04)

Information for Patients


Neuromuscular Disorders

Neuromuscular disorders affect the nerves that control your voluntary muscles. Voluntary muscles are the ones you can control, like in your arms and legs. Your nerve cells, also called neurons, send the messages that control these muscles. When the neurons become unhealthy or die, communication between your nervous system and muscles breaks down. As a result, your muscles weaken and waste away. The weakness can lead to twitching, cramps, aches and pains, and joint and movement problems. Sometimes it also affects heart function and your ability to breathe.

Examples of neuromuscular disorders include

  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis
  • Multiple sclerosis
  • Myasthenia gravis
  • Spinal muscular atrophy

Many neuromuscular diseases are genetic, which means they run in families or there is a mutation in your genes. Sometimes, an immune system disorder can cause them. Most of them have no cure. The goal of treatment is to improve symptoms, increase mobility and lengthen life.

  • Apraxia (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Hand or foot spasms (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Muscle atrophy (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Muscle function loss (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Muscle twitching (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Myotonia congenita (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Spasticity (Medical Encyclopedia)


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Peripheral Nerve Disorders

Also called: Neuritis, Peripheral neuritis, Peripheral neuropathy

Your peripheral nerves are the ones outside your brain and spinal cord. Like static on a telephone line, peripheral nerve disorders distort or interrupt the messages between the brain and the rest of the body.

There are more than 100 kinds of peripheral nerve disorders. They can affect one nerve or many nerves. Some are the result of other diseases, like diabetic nerve problems. Others, like Guillain-Barre syndrome, happen after a virus infection. Still others are from nerve compression, like carpal tunnel syndrome or thoracic outlet syndrome. In some cases, like complex regional pain syndrome and brachial plexus injuries, the problem begins after an injury. Some people are born with peripheral nerve disorders.

Symptoms often start gradually, and then get worse. They include

  • Numbness
  • Pain
  • Burning or tingling
  • Muscle weakness
  • Sensitivity to touch

Treatment aims to treat any underlying problem, reduce pain and control symptoms.

NIH: National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

  • Axillary nerve dysfunction (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Chronic inflammatory polyneuropathy (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Common peroneal nerve dysfunction (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Distal median nerve dysfunction (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Femoral nerve dysfunction (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Glossopharyngeal neuralgia (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Metabolic neuropathies (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Mononeuritis multiplex (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Neuralgia (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Neuropathy secondary to drugs (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Peripheral neuropathy (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Radial nerve dysfunction (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Sensorimotor polyneuropathy (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Tibial nerve dysfunction (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Ulnar nerve dysfunction (Medical Encyclopedia)


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