ICD-10 Diagnosis Code S03

Dislocation and sprain of joints and ligaments of head

Diagnosis Code S03

ICD-10: S03
Short Description: Dislocation and sprain of joints and ligaments of head
Long Description: Dislocation and sprain of joints and ligaments of head
This is the 2017 version of the ICD-10-CM diagnosis code S03

Code Classification
  • Injury, poisoning and certain other consequences of external causes
    • Injuries to the head (S00-S09)
      • Dislocation and sprain of joints and ligaments of head (S03)

Information for Medical Professionals

Index of Diseases and Injuries
References found for the code S03 in the Index of Diseases and Injuries:

Information for Patients


Dislocations are joint injuries that force the ends of your bones out of position. The cause is often a fall or a blow, sometimes from playing a contact sport. You can dislocate your ankles, knees, shoulders, hips, elbows and jaw. You can also dislocate your finger and toe joints. Dislocated joints often are swollen, very painful and visibly out of place. You may not be able to move it.

A dislocated joint is an emergency. If you have one, seek medical attention. Treatment depends on which joint you dislocate and the severity of the injury. It might include manipulations to reposition your bones, medicine, a splint or sling, and rehabilitation. When properly repositioned, a joint will usually function and move normally again in a few weeks. Once you dislocate a shoulder or kneecap, you are more likely to dislocate it again. Wearing protective gear during sports may help prevent dislocations.

  • Dislocated shoulder - aftercare
  • Dislocation
  • Kneecap dislocation
  • Kneecap dislocation - aftercare
  • Nursemaid's elbow

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Head Injuries

Also called: Cranial injuries, Skull fractures, Skull injuries

Chances are you've bumped your head before. Often, the injury is minor because your skull is hard and it protects your brain. But other head injuries can be more severe, such as a skull fracture, concussion, or traumatic brain injury.

Head injuries can be open or closed. A closed injury does not break through the skull. With an open, or penetrating, injury, an object pierces the skull and enters the brain. Closed injuries are not always less severe than open injuries.

Some common causes of head injuries are falls, motor vehicle accidents, violence, and sports injuries.

It is important to know the warning signs of a moderate or severe head injury. Get help immediately if the injured person has

  • A headache that gets worse or does not go away
  • Repeated vomiting or nausea
  • Convulsions or seizures
  • An inability to wake up
  • Dilated (enlarged) pupil in one or both eyes
  • Slurred speech
  • Weakness or numbness in the arms or legs
  • Loss of coordination
  • Increased confusion, restlessness, or agitation

Doctors use a neurologic exam and imaging tests to make a diagnosis. Treatment depends on the type of injury and how severe it is.

NIH: National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

  • Head injury - first aid
  • Skull fracture

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Sprains and Strains

A sprain is a stretched or torn ligament. Ligaments are tissues that connect bones at a joint. Falling, twisting, or getting hit can all cause a sprain. Ankle and wrist sprains are common. Symptoms include pain, swelling, bruising, and being unable to move your joint. You might feel a pop or tear when the injury happens.

A strain is a stretched or torn muscle or tendon. Tendons are tissues that connect muscle to bone. Twisting or pulling these tissues can cause a strain. Strains can happen suddenly or develop over time. Back and hamstring muscle strains are common. Many people get strains playing sports. Symptoms include pain, muscle spasms, swelling, and trouble moving the muscle.

At first, treatment of both sprains and strains usually involves resting the injured area, icing it, wearing a bandage or device that compresses the area, and medicines. Later treatment might include exercise and physical therapy.

NIH: National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases

  • Ankle sprain - aftercare
  • Elbow sprain -- aftercare
  • Foot sprain - aftercare
  • Hamstring strain - aftercare
  • Hip flexor strain -- aftercare
  • Sprains
  • Strains
  • Tendon repair
  • Wrist sprain - aftercare

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