ICD-10 Diagnosis Code R97.2

Elevated prostate specific antigen [PSA]

Diagnosis Code R97.2

ICD-10: R97.2
Short Description: Elevated prostate specific antigen [PSA]
Long Description: Elevated prostate specific antigen [PSA]
This is the 2017 version of the ICD-10-CM diagnosis code R97.2

Code Classification
  • Symptoms, signs and abnormal clinical and laboratory findings, not elsewhere classified
    • Abnormal tumor markers (R97)
      • Abnormal tumor markers (R97)

Information for Medical Professionals

According to ICD-10-CM guidelines this code should not to be used as a principal diagnosis code when a related definitive diagnosis has been established.
Diagnostic Related Groups
The diagnosis code R97.2 is grouped in the following Diagnostic Related Group(s) (MS-DRG v33.0)


  • Prostate specific antigen abnormal
  • Raised prostate specific antigen

Replaced Code Additional informationCallout TooltipReplaced Code
The National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) has published an update to the ICD-10-CM diagnosis codes which became effective October 1, 2016. This codes was replaced for the FY 2017 (October 1, 2016-September 30, 2017).

This code was replaced in the 2017 ICD-10 code set with the code(s) listed below.
  • R97.20 - Elevated prostate specific antigen [PSA]
  • R97.21 - Rising PSA fol treatment for malignant neoplasm of prostate

Information for Patients

Prostate Cancer Screening

The prostate is the gland below a man's bladder that produces fluid for semen. Cancer screening is looking for cancer before you have any symptoms. Cancer found early may be easier to treat.

There is no standard screening test for prostate cancer. Researchers are studying different tests to find those with the fewest risks and most benefits. One test is the digital rectal exam (DRE). The doctor or nurse inserts a lubricated, gloved finger into your rectum to feel the prostate for lumps or anything unusual. Another test is the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) blood test. Your PSA level may be high if you have prostate cancer. It can also be high if you have an enlarged prostate (BPH) or other prostate problems. If your screening results are abnormal, your doctor may do more tests, such as an ultrasound, MRI, or a biopsy.

Prostate cancer screening has risks:

  • Finding prostate cancer may not improve your health or help you live longer
  • The results can sometimes be wrong
  • Follow-up tests, such as a biopsy, may have complications

You and your doctor should discuss your risk for prostate cancer, the pros and cons of the screening tests, and whether you should get them.

  • Digital rectal exam
  • Prostate biopsy
  • Prostate cancer screenings
  • PSA

[Read More]

Prostate Diseases

The prostate is a gland in men. It helps make semen, the fluid that contains sperm. The prostate surrounds the tube that carries urine away from the bladder and out of the body. A young man's prostate is about the size of a walnut. It slowly grows larger with age. If it gets too large, it can cause problems. This is very common after age 50. The older men get, the more likely they are to have prostate trouble.

Some common problems are

  • Prostatitis - inflammation, usually caused by bacteria
  • Enlarged prostate (BPH), or benign prostatic hyperplasia - a common problem in older men which may cause dribbling after urination or a need to go often, especially at night
  • Prostate cancer - a common cancer that responds best to treatment when detected early

NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

  • Digital rectal exam
  • Prostate Problems - NIH (National Institute on Aging)
  • Prostatitis - acute
  • Prostatitis - nonbacterial
  • Prostatitis-bacterial - self-care
  • Urinary Retention - NIH (National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases)

[Read More]
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