ICD-10 Diagnosis Code R94.31

Abnormal electrocardiogram [ECG] [EKG]

Diagnosis Code R94.31

ICD-10: R94.31
Short Description: Abnormal electrocardiogram [ECG] [EKG]
Long Description: Abnormal electrocardiogram [ECG] [EKG]
This is the 2018 version of the ICD-10-CM diagnosis code R94.31

Valid for Submission
The code R94.31 is valid for submission for HIPAA-covered transactions.

Code Classification
  • Symptoms, signs and abnormal clinical and laboratory findings, not elsewhere classified (R00–R99)
    • Abnormal findings on diagnostic imaging and in function studies, without diagnosis (R90-R94)
      • Abnormal results of function studies (R94)

Information for Medical Professionals

According to ICD-10-CM guidelines this code should not to be used as a principal diagnosis code when a related definitive diagnosis has been established.
Diagnostic Related Groups
The diagnosis code R94.31 is grouped in the following Diagnostic Related Group(s) (MS-DRG V34.0)

  • 314 - OTHER CIRCULATORY SYSTEM DIAGNOSES WITH MCC
  • 315 - OTHER CIRCULATORY SYSTEM DIAGNOSES WITH CC
  • 316 - OTHER CIRCULATORY SYSTEM DIAGNOSES WITHOUT CC/MCC

Convert to ICD-9 Additional informationCallout TooltipGeneral Equivalence Map
The ICD-10 and ICD-9 GEMs are used to facilitate linking between the diagnosis codes in ICD-9-CM and the new ICD-10-CM code set. The GEMs are the raw material from which providers, health information vendors and payers can derive specific applied mappings to meet their needs.
  • 794.31 - Abnorm electrocardiogram

Synonyms
  • Ambulatory electrocardiogram abnormal
  • Anterior and lateral ST segment elevation
  • Anterior myocardial infarction on electrocardiogram
  • Anterior ST segment depression
  • Anterior ST segment elevation
  • Anterior T wave inversion
  • Bifid P wave
  • Bifid T wave
  • Bifid U wave
  • Borderline abnormal electrocardiogram
  • Clockwise cardiac rotation
  • Counterclockwise cardiac rotation
  • Counterclockwise vectorcardiographic loop
  • Decreased electrocardiogram voltage
  • Deep S wave
  • Deep symmetric anterior T wave inversion
  • Diffuse ST segment depression
  • Digitalis toxicity by electrocardiogram
  • Diminished left ventricle forces by electrocardiogram
  • Diminished right ventricle forces by electrocardiogram
  • Electrical alternation of heart
  • Electrocardiogram abnormal
  • Electrocardiogram artefact
  • Electrocardiogram showing electrical capture following temporary pacing
  • Electrocardiogram showing paced rhythm with electrical capture
  • Electrocardiogram: bradycardia
  • Electrocardiogram: bradycardia
  • Electrocardiogram: ectopic beats
  • Electrocardiogram: ectopic beats with multifocal premature ventricular contractions
  • Electrocardiogram: ectopic beats with premature atrial contraction
  • Electrocardiogram: ectopic beats with unifocal premature ventricular contractions
  • Electrocardiogram: extrasystole
  • Electrocardiogram: F wave absent
  • Electrocardiogram: idioventricular rhythm
  • Electrocardiogram: junctional rhythm
  • Electrocardiogram: junctional tachycardia
  • Electrocardiogram: paced rhythm
  • Electrocardiogram: pacemaker active
  • Electrocardiogram: paroxysmal atrial tachycardia
  • Electrocardiogram: paroxysmal ventricular tachycardia
  • Electrocardiogram: partial atrioventricular block - 2:1
  • Electrocardiogram: partial atrioventricular block - 3:1
  • Electrocardiogram: partial atrioventricular block - long PR
  • Electrocardiogram: partial sinoatrial block
  • Electrocardiogram: premature ventricular contractions
  • Electrocardiogram: pulseless electrical activity
  • Electrocardiogram: Q-T interval abnormal
  • Electrocardiogram: sinus arrhythmia
  • Electrocardiogram: sinus bradycardia
  • Electrocardiogram: sinus rhythm
  • Electrocardiogram: sinus rhythm
  • Electrocardiogram: sinus rhythm
  • Electrocardiogram: sinus tachycardia
  • Electrocardiogram: U wave exaggerated
  • Electrocardiogram: ventricular ectopics
  • Electrocardiographic accelerated junctional rhythm
  • Electrocardiographic asystole
  • Electrocardiographic atrial ectopics
  • Electrocardiographic atrial fibrillation
  • Electrocardiographic atrial flutter
  • Electrocardiographic atrial tachycardia
  • Electrocardiographic axis perpendicular to frontal plane
  • Electrocardiographic focal atrial tachycardia
  • Electrocardiographic heart block
  • Electrocardiographic junctional escape rhythm
  • Electrocardiographic left bundle branch block
  • Electrocardiographic left ventricle hypertrophy
  • Electrocardiographic left ventricular strain
  • Electrocardiographic multifocal atrial tachycardia
  • Electrocardiographic myocardial infarction
  • Electrocardiographic myocardial ischemia
  • Electrocardiographic P wave abnormal
  • Electrocardiographic P-R interval abnormal
  • Electrocardiographic Q wave abnormal
  • Electrocardiographic QRS complex abnormal
  • Electrocardiographic R wave abnormal
  • Electrocardiographic right ventricular hypertrophy
  • Electrocardiographic S wave abnormal
  • Electrocardiographic ST interval abnormal
  • Electrocardiographic ST segment changes
  • Electrocardiographic supraventricular arrhythmia
  • Electrocardiographic supraventricular tachycardia
  • Electrocardiographic T wave abnormal
  • Electrocardiographic torsades de pointes
  • Electrocardiographic U wave abnormal
  • Electrocardiographic ventricular arrhythmia
  • Electrocardiographic ventricular fibrillation
  • Electrocardiographic ventricular tachycardia
  • Electrocardiographic ventricular tachycardia
  • Electrocardiographic ventricular tachycardia
  • Electrocardiographic ventricular tachycardia monomorphic
  • Electrocardiographic ventricular tachycardia polymorphic
  • Finding of atrioventricular conduction pattern
  • Finding of atrioventricular conduction pattern
  • Finding of cardiac conduction pattern
  • Finding of cardiac conduction pattern
  • Finding of cardiac conduction pattern
  • Finding of electrocardiogram F wave
  • Finding of electrocardiogram P wave
  • Finding of electrocardiogram P wave
  • Finding of electrocardiogram P wave
  • Finding of electrocardiogram P wave
  • Finding of electrocardiogram P wave
  • Finding of electrocardiogram P wave axis
  • Finding of electrocardiogram P wave axis
  • Finding of electrocardiogram P wave axis
  • Finding of electrocardiogram PR interval
  • Finding of electrocardiogram PR interval
  • Finding of electrocardiogram PR interval
  • Finding of electrocardiogram PR interval
  • Finding of electrocardiogram PR interval
  • Finding of electrocardiogram PR interval
  • Finding of electrocardiogram Q wave
  • Finding of electrocardiogram Q wave
  • Finding of electrocardiogram Q wave
  • Finding of electrocardiogram Q wave
  • Finding of electrocardiogram QRS Axis
  • Finding of electrocardiogram QRS Axis
  • Finding of electrocardiogram QRS Axis
  • Finding of electrocardiogram QRS Axis
  • Finding of electrocardiogram QRS Axis
  • Finding of electrocardiogram QRS complex
  • Finding of electrocardiogram QRS complex
  • Finding of electrocardiogram QRS complex
  • Finding of electrocardiogram QRS complex
  • Finding of electrocardiogram QRS complex
  • Finding of electrocardiogram QT interval
  • Finding of electrocardiogram QT interval
  • Finding of electrocardiogram R wave
  • Finding of electrocardiogram R wave
  • Finding of electrocardiogram R wave
  • Finding of electrocardiogram R wave
  • Finding of electrocardiogram S wave
  • Finding of electrocardiogram S wave
  • Finding of electrocardiogram S wave
  • Finding of electrocardiogram S wave
  • Finding of electrocardiogram T wave duration
  • Finding of electrocardiogram voltage
  • Finding of TU interval
  • Finding of TU interval
  • Finding of TU interval
  • Finding of TU interval
  • Flat U wave
  • Flattened P wave
  • Flattened T wave
  • Flattened U wave
  • High T-voltage
  • Hypertrophy of cardiac atrium, determined by electrocardiogram
  • Hypertrophy of cardiac atrium, determined by electrocardiogram
  • Hypertrophy of cardiac ventricle, determined by electrocardiogram
  • Hypertrophy of left cardiac atrium, determined by electrocardiogram
  • Hypogonadism, diabetes mellitus, alopecia, mental retardation and electrocardiographic abnormalities
  • Inadequate electrocardiogram tracing
  • Inferior and lateral ST segment elevation
  • Inferior and right sided ST segment elevation
  • Inferior ST segment depression
  • Inferior ST segment elevation
  • Inverted biphasic anterior T wave
  • Inverted P wave
  • Inverted T wave
  • Inverted U wave
  • Lateral ST segment elevation
  • Left axis deviation
  • Left axis deviation greater than -90 degrees by electrocardiogram
  • Left ventricular hypertrophy by electrocardiogram
  • Left ventricular ST changes
  • Low QRS voltages
  • Low QRS voltages in the limb leads
  • Low QRS voltages in the precordial leads
  • Low U wave
  • Low ventricular voltage by electrocardiogram
  • Myocardial hypertrophy, determined by electrocardiogram
  • Myocardial hypertrophy, determined by electrocardiogram
  • Narrow QRS complex
  • Nonspecific ST-T abnormality on electrocardiogram
  • P mitrale
  • P pulmonale
  • P wave axis superior
  • P wave left axis deviation
  • P wave right axis deviation
  • Paired ventricular premature complexes on electrocardiogram
  • Pathological Q wave
  • Posterior ST segment depression
  • Posterior ST segment elevation
  • PR depression
  • PR elevation
  • Prolonged P wave
  • Prolonged PR interval
  • Prolonged ST segment
  • Prolonged T wave
  • Prolonged TU interval
  • Prolonged U wave
  • Q wave height decreased
  • Q wave height increased
  • QRS complex height decreased
  • QRS complex height increased
  • Quinidine toxicity by electrocardiogram
  • R wave height decreased
  • R wave height increased
  • Reverse tick ST segment
  • Right atrial hypertrophy by electrocardiogram
  • Right axis deviation
  • Right ventricular ST changes
  • rSr pattern in V1 and V2
  • S wave height decreased
  • S wave height increased
  • Secondary ST-T abnormality on electrocardiogram
  • Shortened P wave
  • Shortened PR interval
  • Shortened QT interval
  • Shortened ST interval
  • Shortened ST segment
  • Shortened T wave
  • Shortened TU interval
  • Shortened U wave
  • Sloping PR interval
  • Sloping ST segment
  • ST segment depression
  • ST segment elevation
  • Superior axis
  • T wave alternans on electrocardiogram
  • Tall P wave
  • Tall R wave
  • Tall T wave
  • Tall tented T wave
  • Tall U wave
  • TU depression
  • TU elevation
  • Type A Wolff-Parkinson-White pattern
  • Type B Wolff-Parkinson-White pattern
  • Ventricular escape rhythm on electrocardiogram
  • Ventricular inversion
  • Wide QRS complex

Index of Diseases and Injuries
References found for the code R94.31 in the Index of Diseases and Injuries:


Information for Patients


Heart Health Tests

Also called: Cardiac Diagnostic Tests

Heart diseases are the number one killer in the U.S. They are also a major cause of disability. If you do have a heart disease, it is important to find it early, when it is easier to treat. Blood tests and heart health tests can help find heart diseases or identify problems that can lead to heart diseases. There are several different types of heart health tests. Your doctor will decide which test or tests you need, based on your symptoms (if any), risk factors, and medical history.

Cardiac Catheterization

Cardiac catheterization is a medical procedure used to diagnose and treat some heart conditions. For the procedure, your doctor puts a catheter (a long, thin, flexible tube) into a blood vessel in your arm, groin, or neck, and threads it to your heart. The doctor can use the catheter to

  • Do a coronary angiography. This involves putting a special type of dye in the catheter, so the dye can flow through your bloodstream to your heart. Then your doctor takes x-rays of your heart. The dye allows your doctor to see your coronary arteries on the x-ray, and to check for coronary artery disease (plaque buildup in the arteries).
  • Take samples of blood and heart muscle
  • Do procedures such as minor heart surgery or angioplasty, if your doctor finds that you need it

Cardiac CT Scan

A cardiac CT (computed tomography) scan is a painless imaging test that uses x-rays to take detailed pictures of your heart and its blood vessels. Computers can combine these pictures to create a three-dimensional (3D) model of the whole heart. This test can help doctors detect or evaluate

  • Coronary artery disease
  • Calcium buildup in the coronary arteries
  • Problems with the aorta
  • Problems with heart function and valves
  • Pericardial diseases

Before you have the test, you get an injection of contrast dye. The dye highlights your heart and blood vessels in the pictures. The CT scanner is a large, tunnel-like machine. You lie still on a table which slides you into the scanner, and the scanner takes the pictures for about 15 minutes.

Cardiac MRI

Cardiac MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) is a painless imaging test that uses radio waves, magnets, and a computer to create detailed pictures of your heart. It can help your doctor figure out whether you have heart disease, and if so, how severe it is. A cardiac MRI can also help your doctor decide the best way to treat heart problems such as

  • Coronary artery disease
  • Heart valve problems
  • Pericarditis
  • Cardiac tumors
  • Damage from a heart attack

The MRI is a large, tunnel-like machine. You lie still on a table which slides you into the MRI machine. The machine makes loud noises as it takes pictures of your heart. It usually takes about 30-90 minutes. Sometimes before the test, you might get an injection of contrast dye. The dye highlights your heart and blood vessels in the pictures.

Chest X-Ray

A chest x-ray creates pictures of the organs and structures inside your chest, such as your heart, lungs, and blood vessels. It can reveal signs of heart failure, as well as lung disorders and other causes of symptoms not related to heart disease.

Coronary Angiography

Coronary angiography (angiogram) is a procedure that uses contrast dye and x-ray pictures to look at the insides of your arteries. It can show whether plaque is blocking your arteries and how severe the blockage is. Doctors use this procedure to diagnose heart diseases after chest pain, sudden cardiac arrest, or abnormal results from other heart tests such as an EKG or a stress test.

You usually have a cardiac catheterization to get the dye into your coronary arteries. Then you have special x-rays while the dye is flowing through your coronary arteries. The dye lets your doctor study the flow of blood through your heart and blood vessels.

Echocardiography

Echocardiography, or echo, is a painless test that uses sound waves to create moving pictures of your heart. The pictures show the size and shape of your heart. They also show how well your heart's chambers and valves are working. Doctors use an echo to diagnose many different heart problems, and to check how severe they are.

For the test, a technician applies gel to your chest. The gel helps sound waves reach your heart. The technician moves a transducer (wand-like device) around on your chest. The transducer connects to a computer. It transmits ultrasound waves into your chest, and the waves bounce (echo) back. The computer converts the echoes into pictures of your heart.

Electrocardiogram (EKG), (ECG)

An electrocardiogram, also called an ECG or EKG, is a painless test that detects and records your heart's electrical activity. It shows how fast your heart is beating and whether its rhythm is steady or irregular.

An EKG may be part of a routine exam to screen for heart disease. Or you may get it to detect and study heart problems such as heart attacks, arrhythmia, and heart failure.

For the test, you lie still on a table and a nurse or technician attaches electrodes (patches that have sensors) to the skin on your chest, arms, and legs. Wires connect the electrodes to a machine that records your heart's electrical activity.

Stress Testing

Stress testing looks at how your heart works during physical stress. It can help to diagnose coronary artery disease, and to check how severe it is. It can also check for other problems, including heart valve disease and heart failure.

For the test, you exercise (or are given medicine if you are unable to exercise) to make your heart work hard and beat fast. While this is happening, you get an EKG and blood pressure monitoring. Sometimes you may also have an echocardiogram, or other imaging tests such as a nuclear scan. For the nuclear scan, you get an injection of a tracer (a radioactive substance), which travels to your heart. Special cameras detect the energy from the tracer to make pictures of your heart. You have pictures taken after you exercise, and then after you rest.

NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

  • Cardiac catheterization - discharge (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Echocardiogram -- children (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Exercise stress test (Medical Encyclopedia)


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