ICD-10 Diagnosis Code R50.83

Postvaccination fever

Diagnosis Code R50.83

ICD-10: R50.83
Short Description: Postvaccination fever
Long Description: Postvaccination fever
This is the 2017 version of the ICD-10-CM diagnosis code R50.83

Code Classification
  • Symptoms, signs and abnormal clinical and laboratory findings, not elsewhere classified
    • General symptoms and signs (R50-R69)
      • Fever of other and unknown origin (R50)

Information for Medical Professionals

According to ICD-10-CM guidelines this code should not to be used as a principal diagnosis code when a related definitive diagnosis has been established.
Convert to ICD-9 Additional informationCallout TooltipGeneral Equivalence Map
The ICD-10 and ICD-9 GEMs are used to facilitate linking between the diagnosis codes in ICD-9-CM and the new ICD-10-CM code set. The GEMs are the raw material from which providers, health information vendors and payers can derive specific applied mappings to meet their needs.
  • 780.63 - Postvaccination fever

  • Post diphtheria vaccination fever
  • Post diphtheria,tetanus and pertussis vaccination fever
  • Post pertussis vaccination fever
  • Post tetanus vaccination fever
  • Post vaccination fever
  • Postprocedural fever

Index of Diseases and Injuries
References found for the code R50.83 in the Index of Diseases and Injuries:

Information for Patients


Also called: Pyrexia

A fever is a body temperature that is higher than normal. It is not an illness. It is part of your body's defense against infection. Most bacteria and viruses that cause infections do well at the body's normal temperature (98.6 F). A slight fever can make it harder for them to survive. Fever also activates your body's immune system.

Infections cause most fevers. There can be many other causes, including

  • Medicines
  • Heat exhaustion
  • Cancers
  • Autoimmune diseases

Treatment depends on the cause of your fever. Your health care provider may recommend using over-the-counter medicines such as acetaminophen or ibuprofen to lower a very high fever. Adults can also take aspirin, but children with fevers should not take aspirin. It is also important to drink enough liquids to prevent dehydration.

  • Familial Mediterranean fever
  • Fever
  • When your baby or infant has a fever

[Read More]


Also called: Vaccination

Shots may hurt a little, but the diseases they can prevent are a lot worse. Some are even life-threatening. Immunization shots, or vaccinations, are essential. They protect against things like measles, mumps, rubella, hepatitis B, polio, tetanus, diphtheria, and pertussis (whooping cough). Immunizations are important for adults as well as children.

Your immune system helps your body fight germs by producing substances to combat them. Once it does, the immune system "remembers" the germ and can fight it again. Vaccines contain germs that have been killed or weakened. When given to a healthy person, the vaccine triggers the immune system to respond and thus build immunity.

Before vaccines, people became immune only by actually getting a disease and surviving it. Immunizations are an easier and less risky way to become immune.

NIH: National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

  • Immunizations - diabetes

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