ICD-10 Diagnosis Code R41.81

Age-related cognitive decline

Diagnosis Code R41.81

ICD-10: R41.81
Short Description: Age-related cognitive decline
Long Description: Age-related cognitive decline
This is the 2018 version of the ICD-10-CM diagnosis code R41.81

Valid for Submission
The code R41.81 is valid for submission for HIPAA-covered transactions.

Code Classification
  • Symptoms, signs and abnormal clinical and laboratory findings, not elsewhere classified (R00–R99)
    • Symptoms and signs involving cognition, perception, emotional state and behavior (R40-R46)
      • Oth symptoms and signs w cognitive functions and awareness (R41)

Information for Medical Professionals

According to ICD-10-CM guidelines this code should not to be used as a principal diagnosis code when a related definitive diagnosis has been established.

Code Edits
The following edits are applicable to this code:
Adult diagnoses Additional informationCallout TooltipAdult diagnoses
Adult. Age range is 15–124 years inclusive (e.g., senile delirium, mature cataract).


Convert to ICD-9 Additional informationCallout TooltipGeneral Equivalence Map
The ICD-10 and ICD-9 GEMs are used to facilitate linking between the diagnosis codes in ICD-9-CM and the new ICD-10-CM code set. The GEMs are the raw material from which providers, health information vendors and payers can derive specific applied mappings to meet their needs.

Synonyms
  • Age-related cognitive decline
  • Old-age
  • On examination - senile - old age
  • On examination - senility - no psychosis
  • Senility

Index of Diseases and Injuries
References found for the code R41.81 in the Index of Diseases and Injuries:


Information for Patients


Dementia

Also called: Senility

Dementia is the name for a group of symptoms caused by disorders that affect the brain. It is not a specific disease. People with dementia may not be able to think well enough to do normal activities, such as getting dressed or eating. They may lose their ability to solve problems or control their emotions. Their personalities may change. They may become agitated or see things that are not there.

Memory loss is a common symptom of dementia. However, memory loss by itself does not mean you have dementia. People with dementia have serious problems with two or more brain functions, such as memory and language. Although dementia is common in very elderly people, it is not part of normal aging.

Many different diseases can cause dementia, including Alzheimer's disease and stroke. Drugs are available to treat some of these diseases. While these drugs cannot cure dementia or repair brain damage, they may improve symptoms or slow down the disease.

NIH: National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

  • Dementia (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Dementia - behavior and sleep problems (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Dementia - daily care (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Dementia - keeping safe in the home (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Dementia and driving (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Dementia due to metabolic causes (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Mental status testing (Medical Encyclopedia)


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Mild Cognitive Impairment

Also called: MCI

Some forgetfulness can be a normal part of aging. However, some people have more memory problems than other people their age. This condition is called mild cognitive impairment, or MCI. People with MCI can take care of themselves and do their normal activities.

MCI memory problems may include

  • Losing things often
  • Forgetting to go to events and appointments
  • Having more trouble coming up with words than other people of the same age

Memory problems can also have other causes, including certain medicines and diseases that affect the blood vessels that supply the brain. Some of the problems brought on by these conditions can be managed or reversed.

Your health care provider can do thinking, memory, and language tests to see if you have MCI. You may also need to see a specialist for more tests. Because MCI may be an early sign of Alzheimer's disease, it's really important to see your health care provider every 6 to 12 months.

At this time, there is no proven drug treatment for MCI. Your health care provider can check to see if you have any changes in your memory or thinking skills over time.

NIH: National Institute on Aging

  • Mental status testing (Medical Encyclopedia)


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Seniors' Health

People in the U.S. are living longer than ever before. Many seniors live active and healthy lives. But there's no getting around one thing: as we age, our bodies and minds change. There are things you can do to stay healthy and active as you age. It is important to understand what to expect. Some changes may just be part of normal aging, while others may be a warning sign of a medical problem. It is important to know the difference, and to let your health care provider know if you have any concerns.

Having a healthy lifestyle can help you to deal with normal aging changes and make the most of your life.


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