ICD-10 Diagnosis Code R09.01


Diagnosis Code R09.01

ICD-10: R09.01
Short Description: Asphyxia
Long Description: Asphyxia
This is the 2017 version of the ICD-10-CM diagnosis code R09.01

Code Classification
  • Symptoms, signs and abnormal clinical and laboratory findings, not elsewhere classified
    • Symptoms and signs involving the circulatory and respiratory systems (R00-R09)
      • Oth symptoms and signs involving the circ and resp sys (R09)

Information for Medical Professionals

According to ICD-10-CM guidelines this code should not to be used as a principal diagnosis code when a related definitive diagnosis has been established.
Diagnostic Related Groups
The diagnosis code R09.01 is grouped in the following Diagnostic Related Group(s) (MS-DRG v33.0)


Convert to ICD-9 Additional informationCallout TooltipGeneral Equivalence Map
The ICD-10 and ICD-9 GEMs are used to facilitate linking between the diagnosis codes in ICD-9-CM and the new ICD-10-CM code set. The GEMs are the raw material from which providers, health information vendors and payers can derive specific applied mappings to meet their needs.

  • Asphyxiation
  • Collapse
  • Inhalation of liquid in lower respiratory tract
  • On examination - collapse - asphyxia
  • On examination - respiratory arrest
  • Pulmonary aspiration of fluid
  • Suffocating

Information for Patients

Breathing Problems

When you're short of breath, it's hard or uncomfortable for you to take in the oxygen your body needs. You may feel as if you're not getting enough air. Sometimes mild breathing problems are from a stuffy nose or hard exercise. But shortness of breath can also be a sign of a serious disease.

Many conditions can make you feel short of breath. Lung conditions such as asthma, emphysema or pneumonia cause breathing difficulties. So can problems with your trachea or bronchi, which are part of your airway system. Heart disease can make you feel breathless if your heart cannot pump enough blood to supply oxygen to your body. Stress caused by anxiety can also make it hard for you to breathe. If you often have trouble breathing, it is important to find out the cause.

  • Blood gases
  • Breath sounds
  • Breathing difficulty
  • Breathing difficulty - lying down
  • How to breathe when you are short of breath
  • How to Properly Put On, Take Off a Disposable Respirator (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)
  • Pulmonary function tests
  • Rapid shallow breathing
  • Wheezing

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Food or small objects can cause choking if they get caught in your throat and block your airway. This keeps oxygen from getting to your lungs and brain. If your brain goes without oxygen for more than four minutes, you could have brain damage or die.

Young children are at an especially high risk of choking. They can choke on foods like hot dogs, nuts and grapes, and on small objects like toy pieces and coins. Keep hazards out of their reach and supervise them when they eat.

When someone is choking, quick action can be lifesaving. Learn how to do back blows, the Heimlich maneuver (abdominal thrusts), and CPR.

  • Blockage of upper airway
  • Choking - unconscious adult or child over 1 year
  • Foreign object - inhaled or swallowed

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People drown when they get too much water in their lungs. You can drown in as little as an inch or two of water. Babies can drown in a sink or bathtub. Preschoolers are most likely to drown in a swimming pool. People who have seizure disorders are also at risk in the water. Drowning can happen quickly and silently.

Drowning precautions should include

  • Fences around pools
  • Supervising children near any body of water, including tubs
  • Not swimming or boating when under the influence of alcohol or sedatives
  • Wearing life jackets when boating
  • Learning CPR

  • Near drowning

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