ICD-10 Diagnosis Code R06.7


Diagnosis Code R06.7

ICD-10: R06.7
Short Description: Sneezing
Long Description: Sneezing
This is the 2017 version of the ICD-10-CM diagnosis code R06.7

Code Classification
  • Symptoms, signs and abnormal clinical and laboratory findings, not elsewhere classified
    • Symptoms and signs involving the circulatory and respiratory systems (R00-R09)
      • Abnormalities of breathing (R06)

Information for Medical Professionals

According to ICD-10-CM guidelines this code should not to be used as a principal diagnosis code when a related definitive diagnosis has been established.
Diagnostic Related Groups
The diagnosis code R06.7 is grouped in the following Diagnostic Related Group(s) (MS-DRG v33.0)


Convert to ICD-9 Additional informationCallout TooltipGeneral Equivalence Map
The ICD-10 and ICD-9 GEMs are used to facilitate linking between the diagnosis codes in ICD-9-CM and the new ICD-10-CM code set. The GEMs are the raw material from which providers, health information vendors and payers can derive specific applied mappings to meet their needs.

  • Nasal symptom
  • Photoptarmosis
  • Reverse sneezing
  • Sneezing
  • Sneezing symptom

Information for Patients


Also called: Hypersensitivity

An allergy is a reaction by your immune system to something that does not bother most other people. People who have allergies often are sensitive to more than one thing. Substances that often cause reactions are

  • Pollen
  • Dust mites
  • Mold spores
  • Pet dander
  • Food
  • Insect stings
  • Medicines

Normally, your immune system fights germs. It is your body's defense system. In most allergic reactions, however, it is responding to a false alarm. Genes and the environment probably both play a role.

Allergies can cause a variety of symptoms such as a runny nose, sneezing, itching, rashes, swelling, or asthma. Allergies can range from minor to severe. Anaphylaxis is a severe reaction that can be life-threatening. Doctors use skin and blood tests to diagnose allergies. Treatments include medicines, allergy shots, and avoiding the substances that cause the reactions.

NIH: National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

  • Allergic reactions
  • Allergic rhinitis - self-care
  • Allergies
  • Allergies, asthma, and dust
  • Allergies, asthma, and molds
  • Allergy testing - skin
  • Angioedema
  • Antihistamines for allergies

[Read More]

Common Cold

Sneezing, sore throat, a stuffy nose, coughing - everyone knows the symptoms of the common cold. It is probably the most common illness. In the course of a year, people in the United States suffer 1 billion colds.

You can get a cold by touching your eyes or nose after you touch surfaces with cold germs on them. You can also inhale the germs. Symptoms usually begin 2 or 3 days after infection and last 2 to 14 days. Washing your hands and staying away from people with colds will help you avoid colds.

There is no cure for the common cold. For relief, try

  • Getting plenty of rest
  • Drinking fluids
  • Gargling with warm salt water
  • Using cough drops or throat sprays
  • Taking over-the-counter pain or cold medicines

However, do not give aspirin to children. And do not give cough medicine to children under four.

NIH: National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

  • Common cold
  • Common cold - how to treat at home
  • Stuffy or runny nose - adult
  • Stuffy or runny nose - children

[Read More]

Hay Fever

Also called: Pollen allergy

Each spring, summer, and fall, trees, weeds, and grasses release tiny pollen grains into the air. Some of the pollen ends up in your nose and throat. This can trigger a type of allergy called hay fever.

Symptoms can include

  • Sneezing, often with a runny or clogged nose
  • Coughing and postnasal drip
  • Itching eyes, nose and throat
  • Red and watery eyes
  • Dark circles under the eyes

Your health care provider may diagnose hay fever based on a physical exam and your symptoms. Sometimes skin or blood tests are used. Taking medicines and using nasal sprays can relieve symptoms. You can also rinse out your nose, but be sure to use distilled or sterilized water with saline. Allergy shots can help make you less sensitive to pollen and provide long-term relief.

NIH: National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

  • Allergic rhinitis
  • Allergic rhinitis - self-care
  • Allergies, asthma, and pollen
  • Allergy testing - skin

[Read More]
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