ICD-10 Diagnosis Code Q85.8

Other phakomatoses, not elsewhere classified

Diagnosis Code Q85.8

ICD-10: Q85.8
Short Description: Other phakomatoses, not elsewhere classified
Long Description: Other phakomatoses, not elsewhere classified
This is the 2017 version of the ICD-10-CM diagnosis code Q85.8

Code Classification
  • Congenital malformations, deformations and chromosomal abnormalities
    • Other congenital malformations (Q80-Q89)
      • Phakomatoses, not elsewhere classified (Q85)

Information for Medical Professionals

Diagnostic Related Groups
The diagnosis code Q85.8 is grouped in the following Diagnostic Related Group(s) (MS-DRG v33.0)


Convert to ICD-9 Additional informationCallout TooltipGeneral Equivalence Map
The ICD-10 and ICD-9 GEMs are used to facilitate linking between the diagnosis codes in ICD-9-CM and the new ICD-10-CM code set. The GEMs are the raw material from which providers, health information vendors and payers can derive specific applied mappings to meet their needs.

Present on Admission (POA) Additional informationCallout TooltipPresent on Admission
The Present on Admission (POA) indicator is used for diagnosis codes included in claims involving inpatient admissions to general acute care hospitals. POA indicators must be reported to CMS on each claim to facilitate the grouping of diagnoses codes into the proper Diagnostic Related Groups (DRG). CMS publishes a listing of specific diagnosis codes that are exempt from the POA reporting requirement.

The code Q85.8 is exempt from POA reporting.

  • Abnormality of canalization and retrogressive differentiation
  • Angiomatosis of meninges
  • Centrofacial lentiginosis syndrome
  • Combined hamartoma of retina
  • Congenital erector pili hamartoma
  • Congenital leptomeningeal angiomatosis
  • Cowden syndrome
  • Cystic hamartoma of lung and kidney
  • Diffuse smooth muscle hamartoma
  • Epidermal nevus syndrome
  • Hamartoma of intestine
  • Hamartoma of lung
  • Hamartoma of muscle
  • Hamartoma of muscle
  • Hamartoma of pilosebaceous apparatus
  • Hamartoma of retina
  • Hereditary cutaneous vascular syndrome
  • Hereditary neurocutaneous angiomata
  • Juvenile polyposis syndrome
  • Lhermitte-Duclos disease
  • Nevus sebaceous
  • Peutz-Jeghers polyps of small bowel
  • Peutz-Jeghers syndrome
  • Phakomatosis caesiomarmorata
  • Phakomatosis cesioflammea
  • Phakomatosis spilorosea
  • Polyp of small intestine
  • Port-wine stain with associated anomalies
  • Port-wine stain with associated anomalies
  • Port-wine stain with associated anomalies
  • Port-wine stain with oculocutaneous melanosis
  • Port-wine stain with oculocutaneous melanosis
  • Port-wine stain with oculocutaneous melanosis
  • Rhabdomyomatous mesenchymal hamartoma
  • Riley-Smith syndrome
  • Spinal hamartoma
  • Sturge-Weber syndrome
  • Vascular neurocutaneous syndrome
  • Von Hippel-Lindau syndrome

Index of Diseases and Injuries
References found for the code Q85.8 in the Index of Diseases and Injuries:

Information for Patients

Von Hippel-Lindau Disease

Also called: VHL

Von Hippel-Lindau disease (VHL) is a rare, genetic disease that causes tumors and cysts to grow in your body. The tumors can be either cancerous or benign. They can grow in your brain and spinal cord, kidneys, pancreas and, in men, their genital tract. Symptoms of VHL vary and depend on the size and location of the tumors. They may include headaches, problems with balance and walking, dizziness, weakness of the limbs, vision problems and high blood pressure.

Detecting and treating VHL early is important. Treatment usually involves surgery or sometimes radiation therapy. The goal is to treat growths while they are small and before they do permanent damage.

NIH: National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

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Peutz-Jeghers syndrome Peutz-Jeghers syndrome is characterized by the development of noncancerous growths called hamartomatous polyps in the gastrointestinal tract (particularly the stomach and intestines) and a greatly increased risk of developing certain types of cancer.Children with Peutz-Jeghers syndrome often develop small, dark-colored spots on the lips, around and inside the mouth, near the eyes and nostrils, and around the anus. These spots may also occur on the hands and feet. They appear during childhood and often fade as the person gets older. In addition, most people with Peutz-Jeghers syndrome develop multiple polyps in the stomach and intestines during childhood or adolescence. Polyps can cause health problems such as recurrent bowel obstructions, chronic bleeding, and abdominal pain.People with Peutz-Jeghers syndrome have a high risk of developing cancer during their lifetimes. Cancers of the gastrointestinal tract, pancreas, cervix, ovary, and breast are among the most commonly reported tumors.
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Von Hippel-Lindau syndrome Von Hippel-Lindau syndrome is an inherited disorder characterized by the formation of tumors and fluid-filled sacs (cysts) in many different parts of the body. Tumors may be either noncancerous or cancerous and most frequently appear during young adulthood; however, the signs and symptoms of von Hippel-Lindau syndrome can occur throughout life.Tumors called hemangioblastomas are characteristic of von Hippel-Lindau syndrome. These growths are made of newly formed blood vessels. Although they are typically noncancerous, they can cause serious or life-threatening complications. Hemangioblastomas that develop in the brain and spinal cord can cause headaches, vomiting, weakness, and a loss of muscle coordination (ataxia). Hemangioblastomas can also occur in the light-sensitive tissue that lines the back of the eye (the retina). These tumors, which are also called retinal angiomas, may cause vision loss.People with von Hippel-Lindau syndrome commonly develop cysts in the kidneys, pancreas, and genital tract. They are also at an increased risk of developing a type of kidney cancer called clear cell renal cell carcinoma and a type of pancreatic cancer called a pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor.Von Hippel-Lindau syndrome is associated with a type of tumor called a pheochromocytoma, which most commonly occurs in the adrenal glands (small hormone-producing glands located on top of each kidney). Pheochromocytomas are usually noncancerous. They may cause no symptoms, but in some cases they are associated with headaches, panic attacks, excess sweating, or dangerously high blood pressure that may not respond to medication. Pheochromocytomas are particularly dangerous if they develop during pregnancy.About 10 percent of people with von Hippel-Lindau syndrome develop endolymphatic sac tumors, which are noncancerous tumors in the inner ear. These growths can cause hearing loss in one or both ears, as well as ringing in the ears (tinnitus) and problems with balance. Without treatment, these tumors can cause sudden profound deafness.
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Cowden syndrome Cowden syndrome is a disorder characterized by multiple noncancerous, tumor-like growths called hamartomas and an increased risk of developing certain cancers.Almost everyone with Cowden syndrome develops hamartomas. These growths are most commonly found on the skin and mucous membranes (such as the lining of the mouth and nose), but they can also occur in the intestine and other parts of the body. The growth of hamartomas on the skin and mucous membranes typically becomes apparent by a person's late twenties.Cowden syndrome is associated with an increased risk of developing several types of cancer, particularly cancers of the breast, a gland in the lower neck called the thyroid, and the lining of the uterus (the endometrium). Other cancers that have been identified in people with Cowden syndrome include colorectal cancer, kidney cancer, and a form of skin cancer called melanoma. Compared with the general population, people with Cowden syndrome develop these cancers at younger ages, often beginning in their thirties or forties. Other diseases of the breast, thyroid, and endometrium are also common in Cowden syndrome. Additional signs and symptoms can include an enlarged head (macrocephaly) and a rare, noncancerous brain tumor called Lhermitte-Duclos disease. A small percentage of affected individuals have delayed development or intellectual disability.The features of Cowden syndrome overlap with those of another disorder called Bannayan-Riley-Ruvalcaba syndrome. People with Bannayan-Riley-Ruvalcaba syndrome also develop hamartomas and other noncancerous tumors. Both conditions can be caused by mutations in the PTEN gene. Some people with Cowden syndrome have had relatives diagnosed with Bannayan-Riley-Ruvalcaba syndrome, and other individuals have had the characteristic features of both conditions. Based on these similarities, researchers have proposed that Cowden syndrome and Bannayan-Riley-Ruvalcaba syndrome represent a spectrum of overlapping features known as PTEN hamartoma tumor syndrome instead of two distinct conditions.Some people have some of the characteristic features of Cowden syndrome, particularly the cancers associated with this condition, but do not meet the strict criteria for a diagnosis of Cowden syndrome. These individuals are often described as having Cowden-like syndrome.
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