ICD-10 Diagnosis Code Q85.1

Tuberous sclerosis

Diagnosis Code Q85.1

ICD-10: Q85.1
Short Description: Tuberous sclerosis
Long Description: Tuberous sclerosis
This is the 2017 version of the ICD-10-CM diagnosis code Q85.1

Code Classification
  • Congenital malformations, deformations and chromosomal abnormalities
    • Other congenital malformations (Q80-Q89)
      • Phakomatoses, not elsewhere classified (Q85)

Information for Medical Professionals

Convert to ICD-9 Additional informationCallout TooltipGeneral Equivalence Map
The ICD-10 and ICD-9 GEMs are used to facilitate linking between the diagnosis codes in ICD-9-CM and the new ICD-10-CM code set. The GEMs are the raw material from which providers, health information vendors and payers can derive specific applied mappings to meet their needs.
  • 759.5 - Tuberous sclerosis

Present on Admission (POA) Additional informationCallout TooltipPresent on Admission
The Present on Admission (POA) indicator is used for diagnosis codes included in claims involving inpatient admissions to general acute care hospitals. POA indicators must be reported to CMS on each claim to facilitate the grouping of diagnoses codes into the proper Diagnostic Related Groups (DRG). CMS publishes a listing of specific diagnosis codes that are exempt from the POA reporting requirement.

The code Q85.1 is exempt from POA reporting.

  • Ash leaf spot, tuberous sclerosis
  • Benign neoplasm of nail apparatus
  • Fibrous skin tumor of tuberous sclerosis
  • Lymphangioleiomyomatosis due to tuberous sclerosis syndrome
  • Periungual fibroma
  • Periungual fibroma in tuberous sclerosis
  • Pulmonary lymphangioleiomyomatosis
  • Pulmonary tuberose sclerosis
  • Tuberous sclerosis syndrome

Index of Diseases and Injuries
References found for the code Q85.1 in the Index of Diseases and Injuries:

Information for Patients

Tuberous Sclerosis

Also called: TSC, Tuberous sclerosis complex

Tuberous sclerosis is a rare genetic disease that causes benign tumors to grow in the brain and other organs. Symptoms vary, depending on where the tumors grow. They could include

  • Skin problems, such as light patches and thickened skin
  • Seizures
  • Behavior problems
  • Intellectual disabilities
  • Kidney problems

Some people have signs of tuberous sclerosis at birth. In others it can take time for the symptoms to develop. The disease can be mild, or it can cause severe disabilities. In rare cases, tumors in vital organs or other symptoms can be life-threatening.

Tuberous sclerosis has no cure, but treatments can help symptoms. Options include medicines, educational and occupational therapy, surgery, or surgery to treat specific complications.

NIH: National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

  • Tuberous sclerosis

[Read More]

Tuberous sclerosis complex Tuberous sclerosis complex is a genetic disorder characterized by the growth of numerous noncancerous (benign) tumors in many parts of the body. These tumors can occur in the skin, brain, kidneys, and other organs, in some cases leading to significant health problems. Tuberous sclerosis complex also causes developmental problems, and the signs and symptoms of the condition vary from person to person.Virtually all affected people have skin abnormalities, including patches of unusually light-colored skin, areas of raised and thickened skin, and growths under the nails. Tumors on the face called facial angiofibromas are also common beginning in childhood.Tuberous sclerosis complex often affects the brain, causing seizures, behavioral problems such as hyperactivity and aggression, and intellectual disability or learning problems. Some affected children have the characteristic features of autism, a developmental disorder that affects communication and social interaction. Benign brain tumors can also develop in people with tuberous sclerosis complex; these tumors can cause serious or life-threatening complications.Kidney tumors are common in people with tuberous sclerosis complex; these growths can cause severe problems with kidney function and may be life-threatening in some cases. Additionally, tumors can develop in the heart, lungs, and the light-sensitive tissue at the back of the eye (the retina).
[Read More]
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