ICD-10 Diagnosis Code Q78.1

Polyostotic fibrous dysplasia

Diagnosis Code Q78.1

ICD-10: Q78.1
Short Description: Polyostotic fibrous dysplasia
Long Description: Polyostotic fibrous dysplasia
This is the 2017 version of the ICD-10-CM diagnosis code Q78.1

Code Classification
  • Congenital malformations, deformations and chromosomal abnormalities
    • Congenital malformations and deformations of the musculoskeletal system (Q65-Q79)
      • Other osteochondrodysplasias (Q78)

Information for Medical Professionals

Diagnostic Related Groups
The diagnosis code Q78.1 is grouped in the following Diagnostic Related Group(s) (MS-DRG v33.0)


Convert to ICD-9 Additional informationCallout TooltipGeneral Equivalence Map
The ICD-10 and ICD-9 GEMs are used to facilitate linking between the diagnosis codes in ICD-9-CM and the new ICD-10-CM code set. The GEMs are the raw material from which providers, health information vendors and payers can derive specific applied mappings to meet their needs.
  • 756.54 - Polyostotic fibros dyspl

Present on Admission (POA) Additional informationCallout TooltipPresent on Admission
The Present on Admission (POA) indicator is used for diagnosis codes included in claims involving inpatient admissions to general acute care hospitals. POA indicators must be reported to CMS on each claim to facilitate the grouping of diagnoses codes into the proper Diagnostic Related Groups (DRG). CMS publishes a listing of specific diagnosis codes that are exempt from the POA reporting requirement.

The code Q78.1 is exempt from POA reporting.

  • Fibrous dysplasia of bone
  • Polyostotic fibrous dysplasia of bone

Index of Diseases and Injuries
References found for the code Q78.1 in the Index of Diseases and Injuries:

Information for Patients

Birth Defects

A birth defect is a problem that happens while a baby is developing in the mother's body. Most birth defects happen during the first 3 months of pregnancy. One out of every 33 babies in the United States is born with a birth defect.

A birth defect may affect how the body looks, works or both. Some birth defects like cleft lip or neural tube defects are structural problems that can be easy to see. To find others, like heart defects, doctors use special tests. Birth defects can vary from mild to severe. Some result from exposures to medicines or chemicals. For example, alcohol abuse can cause fetal alcohol syndrome. Infections during pregnancy can also result in birth defects. For most birth defects, the cause is unknown.

Some birth defects can be prevented. Taking folic acid can help prevent some birth defects. Talk to your doctor about any medicines you take. Some medicines can cause serious birth defects.

Babies with birth defects may need surgery or other medical treatments. Today, doctors can diagnose many birth defects in the womb. This enables them to treat or even correct some problems before the baby is born.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

  • Intersex

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McCune-Albright syndrome McCune-Albright syndrome is a disorder that affects the bones, skin, and several hormone-producing (endocrine) tissues.People with McCune-Albright syndrome develop areas of abnormal scar-like (fibrous) tissue in their bones, a condition called polyostotic fibrous dysplasia. Polyostotic means the abnormal areas (lesions) may occur in many bones; often they are confined to one side of the body. Replacement of bone with fibrous tissue may lead to fractures, uneven growth, and deformity. When lesions occur in the bones of the skull and jaw it can result in uneven (asymmetric) growth of the face. Asymmetry may also occur in the long bones; uneven growth of leg bones may cause limping. Abnormal curvature of the spine (scoliosis) may also occur. Bone lesions may become cancerous, but this happens in fewer than 1 percent of people with McCune-Albright syndrome.In addition to bone abnormalities, affected individuals usually have light brown patches of skin called café-au-lait spots, which may be present from birth. The irregular borders of the café-au-lait spots in McCune-Albright syndrome are often compared to a map of the coast of Maine. By contrast, café-au-lait spots in other disorders have smooth borders, which are compared to the coast of California. Like the bone lesions, the café-au-lait spots in McCune-Albright syndrome often appear on only one side of the body.Girls with McCune-Albright syndrome usually reach puberty early. These girls usually have menstrual bleeding by age two, many years before secondary sex characteristics such as breast enlargement and pubic hair are evident. This early onset of menstruation is believed to be caused by excess estrogen, a female sex hormone, produced by cysts that develop in one of the ovaries. Less commonly, boys with McCune-Albright syndrome may also experience early puberty.Other endocrine problems may also occur in people with McCune-Albright syndrome. The thyroid gland, a butterfly-shaped organ at the base of the neck, may become enlarged (a condition called a goiter) or develop masses called nodules. About 50 percent of affected individuals produce excessive amounts of thyroid hormone (hyperthyroidism), resulting in a fast heart rate, high blood pressure, weight loss, tremors, sweating, and other symptoms. The pituitary gland (a structure at the base of the brain that makes several hormones) may produce too much growth hormone. Excess growth hormone can result in acromegaly, a condition characterized by large hands and feet, arthritis, and distinctive facial features that are often described as "coarse." Rarely, affected individuals develop Cushing's syndrome, an excess of the hormone cortisol produced by the adrenal glands, which are small glands located on top of each kidney. Cushing's syndrome causes weight gain in the face and upper body, slowed growth in children, fragile skin, fatigue, and other health problems.
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