ICD-10 Diagnosis Code Q77.7

Spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia

Diagnosis Code Q77.7

ICD-10: Q77.7
Short Description: Spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia
Long Description: Spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia
This is the 2017 version of the ICD-10-CM diagnosis code Q77.7

Code Classification
  • Congenital malformations, deformations and chromosomal abnormalities
    • Congenital malformations and deformations of the musculoskeletal system (Q65-Q79)
      • Osteochndrdys w defects of growth of tubular bones and spine (Q77)

Information for Medical Professionals

Diagnostic Related Groups
The diagnosis code Q77.7 is grouped in the following Diagnostic Related Group(s) (MS-DRG v33.0)


Convert to ICD-9 Additional informationCallout TooltipGeneral Equivalence Map
The ICD-10 and ICD-9 GEMs are used to facilitate linking between the diagnosis codes in ICD-9-CM and the new ICD-10-CM code set. The GEMs are the raw material from which providers, health information vendors and payers can derive specific applied mappings to meet their needs.

Present on Admission (POA) Additional informationCallout TooltipPresent on Admission
The Present on Admission (POA) indicator is used for diagnosis codes included in claims involving inpatient admissions to general acute care hospitals. POA indicators must be reported to CMS on each claim to facilitate the grouping of diagnoses codes into the proper Diagnostic Related Groups (DRG). CMS publishes a listing of specific diagnosis codes that are exempt from the POA reporting requirement.

The code Q77.7 is exempt from POA reporting.

  • Autosomal recessive spondyloepimetaphyseal dysplasia
  • Dyggve-Melchior-Clausen syndrome
  • Fibrochondrogenesis
  • Metatropic dysplasia
  • Mild spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia with premature onset arthrosis
  • Multiple dislocations with dysplasia
  • Multiple dislocations with dysplasia
  • Opsismodysplasia
  • Pseudoachondroplastic spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia syndrome
  • Sponastrime dysplasia
  • Spondyloepimetaphyseal disorder
  • Spondyloepimetaphyseal dysplasia with joint laxity
  • Spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia congenita group
  • Spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia tarda
  • Spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia with congenital joint dislocations
  • Spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia with joint laxity
  • Spondyloperipheral dysplasia

Information for Patients

Birth Defects

A birth defect is a problem that happens while a baby is developing in the mother's body. Most birth defects happen during the first 3 months of pregnancy. One out of every 33 babies in the United States is born with a birth defect.

A birth defect may affect how the body looks, works or both. Some birth defects like cleft lip or neural tube defects are structural problems that can be easy to see. To find others, like heart defects, doctors use special tests. Birth defects can vary from mild to severe. Some result from exposures to medicines or chemicals. For example, alcohol abuse can cause fetal alcohol syndrome. Infections during pregnancy can also result in birth defects. For most birth defects, the cause is unknown.

Some birth defects can be prevented. Taking folic acid can help prevent some birth defects. Talk to your doctor about any medicines you take. Some medicines can cause serious birth defects.

Babies with birth defects may need surgery or other medical treatments. Today, doctors can diagnose many birth defects in the womb. This enables them to treat or even correct some problems before the baby is born.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

  • Intersex

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Spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia congenita Spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia congenita is an inherited bone growth disorder that results in short stature (dwarfism), skeletal abnormalities, and problems with vision and hearing. This condition affects the bones of the spine (spondylo-) and the ends (epiphyses) of long bones in the arms and legs. Congenita indicates that the condition is present from birth.People with spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia congenita have short stature from birth, with a very short trunk and neck and shortened limbs. Their hands and feet, however, are usually average-sized. Adult height ranges from 3 feet to just over 4 feet. Abnormal curvature of the spine (kyphoscoliosis and lordosis) becomes more severe during childhood. Instability of the spinal bones (vertebrae) in the neck may increase the risk of spinal cord damage. Other skeletal features include flattened vertebrae (platyspondyly); an abnormality of the hip joint that causes the upper leg bones to turn inward (coxa vara); a foot deformity called a clubfoot; and a broad, barrel-shaped chest. Abnormal development of the chest can cause problems with breathing. Arthritis and decreased joint mobility often develop early in life.People with spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia congenita have mild changes in their facial features. The cheekbones close to the nose may appear flattened. Some infants are born with an opening in the roof of the mouth (a cleft palate). Severe nearsightedness (high myopia) is common, as are other eye problems that can impair vision. About one quarter of people with this condition have hearing loss.
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X-linked spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia tarda X-linked spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia tarda is a condition that impairs bone growth and occurs almost exclusively in males. The name of the condition indicates that it affects the bones of the spine (spondylo-) and the ends (epiphyses) of long bones in the arms and legs. "Tarda" indicates that signs and symptoms of this condition are not present at birth, but appear later in childhood, typically between ages 6 and 10.Males with X-linked spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia tarda have skeletal abnormalities and short stature. Affected boys grow steadily until late childhood, when their growth slows. Male adult height ranges from 4 feet 10 inches to 5 feet 6 inches. Individuals with X-linked spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia tarda have a short trunk and neck, and their arms appear disproportionately long. Impaired growth of the spinal bones (vertebrae) causes the short stature seen in this disorder. The spinal abnormalities include flattened vertebrae (platyspondyly) with hump-shaped bulges, progressive thinning of the discs between vertebrae, and an abnormal curvature of the spine (scoliosis or kyphosis). Other skeletal features of X-linked spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia tarda include an abnormality of the hip joint that causes the upper leg bones to turn inward (coxa vara); a broad, barrel-shaped chest; and decreased mobility of the elbow and hip joints. Arthritis often develops in early adulthood, typically affecting the hip joints and spine.
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