ICD-10 Diagnosis Code Q75.1

Craniofacial dysostosis

Diagnosis Code Q75.1

ICD-10: Q75.1
Short Description: Craniofacial dysostosis
Long Description: Craniofacial dysostosis
This is the 2017 version of the ICD-10-CM diagnosis code Q75.1

Code Classification
  • Congenital malformations, deformations and chromosomal abnormalities
    • Congenital malformations and deformations of the musculoskeletal system (Q65-Q79)
      • Other congenital malformations of skull and face bones (Q75)

Information for Medical Professionals

Diagnostic Related Groups
The diagnosis code Q75.1 is grouped in the following Diagnostic Related Group(s) (MS-DRG v33.0)


Convert to ICD-9 Additional informationCallout TooltipGeneral Equivalence Map
The ICD-10 and ICD-9 GEMs are used to facilitate linking between the diagnosis codes in ICD-9-CM and the new ICD-10-CM code set. The GEMs are the raw material from which providers, health information vendors and payers can derive specific applied mappings to meet their needs.

Present on Admission (POA) Additional informationCallout TooltipPresent on Admission
The Present on Admission (POA) indicator is used for diagnosis codes included in claims involving inpatient admissions to general acute care hospitals. POA indicators must be reported to CMS on each claim to facilitate the grouping of diagnoses codes into the proper Diagnostic Related Groups (DRG). CMS publishes a listing of specific diagnosis codes that are exempt from the POA reporting requirement.

The code Q75.1 is exempt from POA reporting.

  • Acanthosis nigricans
  • Crouzon syndrome
  • Crouzon syndrome with acanthosis nigricans
  • Disorder of ethmoid bone
  • Dysostosis of bone of skull
  • Fronto-frontal dysostosis
  • Fronto-naso-ethmoidal dysostosis
  • Internasal dysostosis
  • Maxillary dysostosis
  • Maxillo-zygomatic dysostosis
  • Naso-maxillary dysostosis
  • Premaxillo-maxillary dysostosis
  • Spheno-frontal dysostosis
  • Sphenoidal dysostosis
  • Temporo-aural dysostosis

Index of Diseases and Injuries
References found for the code Q75.1 in the Index of Diseases and Injuries:

Information for Patients

Craniofacial Abnormalities

Craniofacial is a medical term that relates to the bones of the skull and face. Craniofacial abnormalities are birth defects of the face or head. Some, like cleft lip and palate, are among the most common of all birth defects. Others are very rare. Most of them affect how a person's face or head looks. These conditions may also affect other parts of the body.

Treatment depends on the type of problem. Plastic and reconstructive surgery may help the person's appearance.

  • Apert syndrome
  • Cleidocranial dysostosis
  • Craniosynostosis
  • Craniosynostosis repair
  • Head and face reconstruction
  • Pierre Robin syndrome

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Crouzonodermoskeletal syndrome Crouzonodermoskeletal syndrome is a disorder characterized by the premature joining of certain bones of the skull (craniosynostosis) during development and a skin condition called acanthosis nigricans.The signs and symptoms of Crouzonodermoskeletal syndrome overlap with those of a similar condition called Crouzon syndrome. Common features include premature fusion of the skull bones, which affects the shape of the head and face; wide-set, bulging eyes due to shallow eye sockets; eyes that do not point in the same direction (strabismus); a small, beaked nose; and an underdeveloped upper jaw. People with Crouzon syndrome or Crouzonodermoskeletal syndrome usually have normal intelligence.Several features distinguish Crouzonodermoskeletal syndrome from Crouzon syndrome. People with Crouzonodermoskeletal syndrome have acanthosis nigricans, a skin condition characterized by thick, dark, velvety skin in body folds and creases, including the neck and underarms. In addition, subtle changes may be seen in the bones of the spine (vertebrae) on x-rays. Noncancerous growths called cementomas may develop in the jaw during young adulthood.
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Crouzon syndrome Crouzon syndrome is a genetic disorder characterized by the premature fusion of certain skull bones (craniosynostosis). This early fusion prevents the skull from growing normally and affects the shape of the head and face.Many features of Crouzon syndrome result from the premature fusion of the skull bones. Abnormal growth of these bones leads to wide-set, bulging eyes and vision problems caused by shallow eye sockets; eyes that do not point in the same direction (strabismus); a beaked nose; and an underdeveloped upper jaw. In addition, people with Crouzon syndrome may have dental problems and hearing loss, which is sometimes accompanied by narrow ear canals. A few people with Crouzon syndrome have an opening in the lip and the roof of the mouth (cleft lip and palate). The severity of these signs and symptoms varies among affected people. People with Crouzon syndrome are usually of normal intelligence.
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