ICD-10 Diagnosis Code Q61.2

Polycystic kidney, adult type

Diagnosis Code Q61.2

ICD-10: Q61.2
Short Description: Polycystic kidney, adult type
Long Description: Polycystic kidney, adult type
This is the 2017 version of the ICD-10-CM diagnosis code Q61.2

Code Classification
  • Congenital malformations, deformations and chromosomal abnormalities
    • Congenital malformations of the urinary system (Q60-Q64)
      • Cystic kidney disease (Q61)

Information for Medical Professionals

Diagnostic Related Groups
The diagnosis code Q61.2 is grouped in the following Diagnostic Related Group(s) (MS-DRG v33.0)


Convert to ICD-9 Additional informationCallout TooltipGeneral Equivalence Map
The ICD-10 and ICD-9 GEMs are used to facilitate linking between the diagnosis codes in ICD-9-CM and the new ICD-10-CM code set. The GEMs are the raw material from which providers, health information vendors and payers can derive specific applied mappings to meet their needs.
  • 753.13 - Polycyst kid-autosom dom

Present on Admission (POA) Additional informationCallout TooltipPresent on Admission
The Present on Admission (POA) indicator is used for diagnosis codes included in claims involving inpatient admissions to general acute care hospitals. POA indicators must be reported to CMS on each claim to facilitate the grouping of diagnoses codes into the proper Diagnostic Related Groups (DRG). CMS publishes a listing of specific diagnosis codes that are exempt from the POA reporting requirement.

The code Q61.2 is exempt from POA reporting.

  • Adult type polycystic kidney disease type 1
  • Adult type polycystic kidney disease type 2
  • Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease in childhood
  • Polycystic kidney disease, adult type

Index of Diseases and Injuries
References found for the code Q61.2 in the Index of Diseases and Injuries:

Information for Patients

Kidney Cysts

A cyst is a fluid-filled sac. There are two types of kidney cysts.

Polycystic kidney disease (PKD) runs in families. In PKD, the cysts take the place of the normal tissue. They enlarge the kidneys and make them work poorly, leading to kidney failure. When PKD causes kidneys to fail - which usually happens after many years - people need dialysis or kidney transplantation. About half of people with the most common type of PKD end up with kidney failure. PKD also causes cysts in other parts of the body, such as the liver.

Symptoms of PKD include

  • Pain in the back and lower sides
  • Headaches
  • Urinary tract infections
  • Blood in the urine

Doctors diagnose PKD with imaging tests and family history. Treatments include medications, and, when people with PKD develop kidney failure, dialysis or kidney transplants.

Acquired cystic kidney disease (ACKD) usually happens in people who are on dialysis. Unlike PKD, the kidneys are normal sized, and cysts do not form in other parts of the body. People with ACKD already have chronic kidney disease when they develop cysts. ACKD often has no symptoms. In most cases, the cysts are harmless and do not need treatment.

NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

  • Acquired Cystic Kidney Disease - NIH (National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases)
  • Medullary cystic kidney disease
  • Polycystic kidney disease

[Read More]

Polycystic kidney disease Polycystic kidney disease is a disorder that affects the kidneys and other organs. Clusters of fluid-filled sacs, called cysts, develop in the kidneys and interfere with their ability to filter waste products from the blood. The growth of cysts causes the kidneys to become enlarged and can lead to kidney failure. Cysts may also develop in other organs, particularly the liver.Frequent complications of polycystic kidney disease include dangerously high blood pressure (hypertension), pain in the back or sides, blood in the urine (hematuria), recurrent urinary tract infections, kidney stones, and heart valve abnormalities. Additionally, people with polycystic kidney disease have an increased risk of an abnormal bulging (an aneurysm) in a large blood vessel called the aorta or in blood vessels at the base of the brain. Aneurysms can be life-threatening if they tear or rupture.The two major forms of polycystic kidney disease are distinguished by the usual age of onset and the pattern in which it is passed through families. The autosomal dominant form (sometimes called ADPKD) has signs and symptoms that typically begin in adulthood, although cysts in the kidney are often present from birth or childhood. Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease can be further divided into type 1 and type 2, depending on the genetic cause. The autosomal recessive form of polycystic kidney disease (sometimes called ARPKD) is much rarer and is often lethal early in life. The signs and symptoms of this condition are usually apparent at birth or in early infancy.
[Read More]
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