ICD-10 Diagnosis Code Q26.1

Persistent left superior vena cava

Diagnosis Code Q26.1

ICD-10: Q26.1
Short Description: Persistent left superior vena cava
Long Description: Persistent left superior vena cava
This is the 2017 version of the ICD-10-CM diagnosis code Q26.1

Code Classification
  • Congenital malformations, deformations and chromosomal abnormalities
    • Congenital malformations of the circulatory system (Q20-Q28)
      • Congenital malformations of great veins (Q26)

Information for Medical Professionals

Diagnostic Related Groups
The diagnosis code Q26.1 is grouped in the following Diagnostic Related Group(s) (MS-DRG v33.0)


Convert to ICD-9 Additional informationCallout TooltipGeneral Equivalence Map
The ICD-10 and ICD-9 GEMs are used to facilitate linking between the diagnosis codes in ICD-9-CM and the new ICD-10-CM code set. The GEMs are the raw material from which providers, health information vendors and payers can derive specific applied mappings to meet their needs.

Present on Admission (POA) Additional informationCallout TooltipPresent on Admission
The Present on Admission (POA) indicator is used for diagnosis codes included in claims involving inpatient admissions to general acute care hospitals. POA indicators must be reported to CMS on each claim to facilitate the grouping of diagnoses codes into the proper Diagnostic Related Groups (DRG). CMS publishes a listing of specific diagnosis codes that are exempt from the POA reporting requirement.

The code Q26.1 is exempt from POA reporting.

  • Left superior caval vein persisting to coronary sinus
  • Left superior caval vein persisting to left sided atrium
  • Left superior vena cava persisting to coronary sinus and then to right sided atrium
  • Left superior vena cava persisting to right atrium and left atrium
  • Left superior vena cava persisting to right sided atrium
  • Persistent left superior vena cava

Information for Patients


An aneurysm is a bulge or "ballooning" in the wall of an artery. Arteries are blood vessels that carry oxygen-rich blood from the heart to other parts of the body. If an aneurysm grows large, it can burst and cause dangerous bleeding or even death.

Most aneurysms occur in the aorta, the main artery that runs from the heart through the chest and abdomen. Aneurysms also can happen in arteries in the brain, heart and other parts of the body. If an aneurysm in the brain bursts, it causes a stroke.

Aneurysms can develop and become large before causing any symptoms. Often doctors can stop aneurysms from bursting if they find and treat them early. They use imaging tests to find aneurysms. Often aneurysms are found by chance during tests done for other reasons. Medicines and surgery are the two main treatments for aneurysms.

NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

  • Aneurysm
  • Magnetic resonance angiography

[Read More]

Congenital Heart Defects

A congenital heart defect is a problem with the structure of the heart. It is present at birth. Congenital heart defects are the most common type of birth defect. The defects can involve the walls of the heart, the valves of the heart, and the arteries and veins near the heart. They can disrupt the normal flow of blood through the heart. The blood flow can slow down, go in the wrong direction or to the wrong place, or be blocked completely.

Doctors use a physical exam and special heart tests to diagnose congenital heart defects. They often find severe defects during pregnancy or soon after birth. Signs and symptoms of severe defects in newborns include

  • Rapid breathing
  • Cyanosis - a bluish tint to the skin, lips, and fingernails
  • Fatigue
  • Poor blood circulation

Many congenital heart defects cause few or no signs and symptoms. They are often not diagnosed until children are older.

Many children with congenital heart defects don't need treatment, but others do. Treatment can include medicines, catheter procedures, surgery, and heart transplants. The treatment depends on the type of the defect, how severe it is, and a child's age, size, and general health.

NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

  • Atrial septal defect
  • Bicuspid aortic valve
  • Congenital heart defect corrective surgeries
  • Congenital heart disease
  • Cyanotic heart disease
  • Dextrocardia
  • Echocardiogram -- children
  • Heart murmurs and other sounds
  • Patent ductus arteriosus
  • Ventricular septal defect

[Read More]
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