ICD-10 Diagnosis Code P96.0

Congenital renal failure

Diagnosis Code P96.0

ICD-10: P96.0
Short Description: Congenital renal failure
Long Description: Congenital renal failure
This is the 2017 version of the ICD-10-CM diagnosis code P96.0

Code Classification
  • Certain conditions originating in the perinatal period
    • Other disorders originating in the perinatal period (P90-P96)
      • Other conditions originating in the perinatal period (P96)

Information for Medical Professionals

Convert to ICD-9 Additional informationCallout TooltipGeneral Equivalence Map
The ICD-10 and ICD-9 GEMs are used to facilitate linking between the diagnosis codes in ICD-9-CM and the new ICD-10-CM code set. The GEMs are the raw material from which providers, health information vendors and payers can derive specific applied mappings to meet their needs.

  • Absent renal function
  • Absent renal function
  • Acquired platelet function disorder
  • Acute renal failure with oliguria
  • Anuria
  • Congenital renal failure
  • Congenital uremia
  • Hyperphosphatemia
  • Neonatal renal disorder
  • Neonatal renal disorder
  • Newborn renal dysfunction
  • Newborn renal dysfunction
  • Non-functioning kidney
  • Oliguria and anuria
  • Platelet dysfunction associated with uremia
  • Renal failure syndrome
  • Renal failure-associated hyperphosphatemia
  • Uremia

Index of Diseases and Injuries
References found for the code P96.0 in the Index of Diseases and Injuries:

Information for Patients

Kidney Failure

Also called: ESRD, End-stage renal disease, Renal failure

Healthy kidneys clean your blood by removing excess fluid, minerals, and wastes. They also make hormones that keep your bones strong and your blood healthy. But if the kidneys are damaged, they don't work properly. Harmful wastes can build up in your body. Your blood pressure may rise. Your body may retain excess fluid and not make enough red blood cells. This is called kidney failure.

If your kidneys fail, you need treatment to replace the work they normally do. The treatment options are dialysis or a kidney transplant. Each treatment has benefits and drawbacks. No matter which treatment you choose, you'll need to make some changes in your life, including how you eat and plan your activities. But with the help of healthcare providers, family, and friends, most people with kidney failure can lead full and active lives.

NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

  • Acute kidney failure
  • Acute tubular necrosis
  • Dialysis
  • End-stage kidney disease
  • Glomerular filtration rate

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Uncommon Infant and Newborn Problems

It can be scary when your baby is sick, especially when it is not an everyday problem like a cold or a fever. You may not know whether the problem is serious or how to treat it. If you have concerns about your baby's health, call your health care provider right away.

Learning information about your baby's condition can help ease your worry. Do not be afraid to ask questions about your baby's care. By working together with your health care provider, you make sure that your baby gets the best care possible.

  • Crying - excessive (0-6 months)
  • Failure to thrive
  • Hemorrhagic disease of the newborn
  • Hyperglycemia - infants
  • Neonatal respiratory distress syndrome
  • Neonatal sepsis
  • Neutropenia - infants

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