ICD-10 Diagnosis Code P78.83

Newborn esophageal reflux

Diagnosis Code P78.83

ICD-10: P78.83
Short Description: Newborn esophageal reflux
Long Description: Newborn esophageal reflux
This is the 2017 version of the ICD-10-CM diagnosis code P78.83

Code Classification
  • Certain conditions originating in the perinatal period
    • Digestive system disorders of newborn (P76-P78)
      • Other perinatal digestive system disorders (P78)

Information for Medical Professionals

Convert to ICD-9 Additional informationCallout TooltipGeneral Equivalence Map
The ICD-10 and ICD-9 GEMs are used to facilitate linking between the diagnosis codes in ICD-9-CM and the new ICD-10-CM code set. The GEMs are the raw material from which providers, health information vendors and payers can derive specific applied mappings to meet their needs.

  • Acid reflux
  • Digestive system reflux
  • Digestive system reflux
  • Digestive system reflux
  • Digestive system reflux
  • Duodenogastric reflux
  • Esophageal reflux finding
  • Esophageal reflux finding
  • Excessive gastric reflux
  • Gastric reflux
  • Gastric reflux
  • Gastric reflux
  • Gastric reflux
  • Gastroesophageal reflux disease
  • Gastroesophageal reflux disease
  • Gastroesophageal reflux disease
  • Gastroesophageal reflux disease
  • Gastroesophageal reflux disease
  • Gastroesophageal reflux disease with apnea
  • Gastroesophageal reflux disease with ulceration
  • Gastroesophageal reflux disease without esophagitis
  • Hiatal hernia with gastroesophageal reflux disease
  • Laryngitis due to gastroesophageal reflux
  • Laryngopharyngeal reflux
  • Minimal gastric reflux
  • Moderate gastric reflux

Index of Diseases and Injuries
References found for the code P78.83 in the Index of Diseases and Injuries:

Information for Patients


Also called: Gastroesophageal reflux disease

Your esophagus is the tube that carries food from your mouth to your stomach. Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) happens when a muscle at the end of your esophagus does not close properly. This allows stomach contents to leak back, or reflux, into the esophagus and irritate it.

You may feel a burning in the chest or throat called heartburn. Sometimes, you can taste stomach fluid in the back of the mouth. If you have these symptoms more than twice a week, you may have GERD. You can also have GERD without having heartburn. Your symptoms could include a dry cough, asthma symptoms, or trouble swallowing.

Anyone, including infants and children, can have GERD. If not treated, it can lead to more serious health problems. In some cases, you might need medicines or surgery. However, many people can improve their symptoms by

  • Avoiding alcohol and spicy, fatty or acidic foods that trigger heartburn
  • Eating smaller meals
  • Not eating close to bedtime
  • Losing weight if needed
  • Wearing loose-fitting clothes

NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

  • Anti-reflux surgery
  • Bland diet
  • Gastroesophageal reflux - discharge
  • Gastroesophageal reflux disease
  • Swallowing problems
  • Taking antacids

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Uncommon Infant and Newborn Problems

It can be scary when your baby is sick, especially when it is not an everyday problem like a cold or a fever. You may not know whether the problem is serious or how to treat it. If you have concerns about your baby's health, call your health care provider right away.

Learning information about your baby's condition can help ease your worry. Do not be afraid to ask questions about your baby's care. By working together with your health care provider, you make sure that your baby gets the best care possible.

  • Crying - excessive (0-6 months)
  • Failure to thrive
  • Hemorrhagic disease of the newborn
  • Hyperglycemia - infants
  • Neonatal respiratory distress syndrome
  • Neonatal sepsis
  • Neutropenia - infants

[Read More]
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