ICD-10 Diagnosis Code P78.81

Congenital cirrhosis (of liver)

Diagnosis Code P78.81

ICD-10: P78.81
Short Description: Congenital cirrhosis (of liver)
Long Description: Congenital cirrhosis (of liver)
This is the 2017 version of the ICD-10-CM diagnosis code P78.81

Code Classification
  • Certain conditions originating in the perinatal period
    • Digestive system disorders of newborn (P76-P78)
      • Other perinatal digestive system disorders (P78)

Information for Patients


Also called: Hepatic fibrosis

Cirrhosis is scarring of the liver. Scar tissue forms because of injury or long-term disease. Scar tissue cannot do what healthy liver tissue does - make protein, help fight infections, clean the blood, help digest food and store energy. Cirrhosis can lead to

  • Easy bruising or bleeding, or nosebleeds
  • Swelling of the abdomen or legs
  • Extra sensitivity to medicines
  • High blood pressure in the vein entering the liver
  • Enlarged veins called varices in the esophagus and stomach. Varices can bleed suddenly.
  • Kidney failure
  • Jaundice
  • Severe itching
  • Gallstones

A small number of people with cirrhosis get liver cancer.

Your doctor will diagnose cirrhosis with blood tests, imaging tests, or a biopsy.

Cirrhosis has many causes. In the United States, the most common causes are chronic alcoholism and hepatitis. Nothing will make the scar tissue disappear, but treating the cause can keep it from getting worse. If too much scar tissue forms, you may need to consider a liver transplant.

NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

  • Abdominal tap
  • Ascites
  • Cirrhosis
  • Cirrhosis - discharge
  • Hepatic encephalopathy
  • Transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS)

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Uncommon Infant and Newborn Problems

It can be scary when your baby is sick, especially when it is not an everyday problem like a cold or a fever. You may not know whether the problem is serious or how to treat it. If you have concerns about your baby's health, call your health care provider right away.

Learning information about your baby's condition can help ease your worry. Do not be afraid to ask questions about your baby's care. By working together with your health care provider, you make sure that your baby gets the best care possible.

  • Crying - excessive (0-6 months)
  • Failure to thrive
  • Hemorrhagic disease of the newborn
  • Hyperglycemia - infants
  • Neonatal respiratory distress syndrome
  • Neonatal sepsis
  • Neutropenia - infants

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