ICD-10 Diagnosis Code P71.1

Other neonatal hypocalcemia

Diagnosis Code P71.1

ICD-10: P71.1
Short Description: Other neonatal hypocalcemia
Long Description: Other neonatal hypocalcemia
This is the 2017 version of the ICD-10-CM diagnosis code P71.1

Code Classification
  • Certain conditions originating in the perinatal period
    • Transitory endocrine and metabolic disorders specific to newborn (P70-P74)
      • Transitory neonatal disorders of calcium and magnesium metab (P71)

Information for Patients


You have more calcium in your body than any other mineral. Calcium has many important jobs. The body stores more than 99 percent of its calcium in the bones and teeth to help make and keep them strong. The rest is throughout the body in blood, muscle and the fluid between cells. Your body needs calcium to help muscles and blood vessels contract and expand, to secrete hormones and enzymes and to send messages through the nervous system.

It is important to get plenty of calcium in the foods you eat. Foods rich in calcium include

  • Dairy products such as milk, cheese, and yogurt
  • Leafy, green vegetables
  • Fish with soft bones that you eat, such as canned sardines and salmon
  • Calcium-enriched foods such as breakfast cereals, fruit juices, soy and rice drinks, and tofu. Check the product labels.

The exact amount of calcium you need depends on your age and other factors. Growing children and teenagers need more calcium than young adults. Older women need plenty of calcium to prevent osteoporosis. People who do not eat enough high-calcium foods should take a calcium supplement.

NIH: National Institutes of Health Office of Dietary Supplements

  • Calcium in diet
  • Calcium supplements
  • Calcium, vitamin D, and your bones
  • Hypercalcemia
  • Hypercalcemia - discharge

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Uncommon Infant and Newborn Problems

It can be scary when your baby is sick, especially when it is not an everyday problem like a cold or a fever. You may not know whether the problem is serious or how to treat it. If you have concerns about your baby's health, call your health care provider right away.

Learning information about your baby's condition can help ease your worry. Do not be afraid to ask questions about your baby's care. By working together with your health care provider, you make sure that your baby gets the best care possible.

  • Crying - excessive (0-6 months)
  • Failure to thrive
  • Hemorrhagic disease of the newborn
  • Hyperglycemia - infants
  • Neonatal respiratory distress syndrome
  • Neonatal sepsis
  • Neutropenia - infants

[Read More]
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