ICD-10 Diagnosis Code P61.2

Anemia of prematurity

Diagnosis Code P61.2

ICD-10: P61.2
Short Description: Anemia of prematurity
Long Description: Anemia of prematurity
This is the 2017 version of the ICD-10-CM diagnosis code P61.2

Code Classification
  • Certain conditions originating in the perinatal period
    • Hemorrhagic and hematological disorders of newborn (P50-P61)
      • Other perinatal hematological disorders (P61)

Information for Patients


Also called: Iron poor blood

If you have anemia, your blood does not carry enough oxygen to the rest of your body. The most common cause of anemia is not having enough iron. Your body needs iron to make hemoglobin. Hemoglobin is an iron-rich protein that gives the red color to blood. It carries oxygen from the lungs to the rest of the body.

Anemia has three main causes: blood loss, lack of red blood cell production, and high rates of red blood cell destruction.

Conditions that may lead to anemia include

  • Heavy periods
  • Pregnancy
  • Ulcers
  • Colon polyps or colon cancer
  • Inherited disorders
  • A diet that does not have enough iron, folic acid or vitamin B12
  • Blood disorders such as sickle cell anemia and thalassemia, or cancer
  • Aplastic anemia, a condition that can be inherited or acquired
  • G6PD deficiency, a metabolic disorder

Anemia can make you feel tired, cold, dizzy, and irritable. You may be short of breath or have a headache.

Your doctor will diagnose anemia with a physical exam and blood tests. Treatment depends on the kind of anemia you have.

NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

  • Anemia
  • Anemia - B12 deficiency
  • Anemia caused by low iron -- infants and toddlers
  • Anemia of chronic disease
  • Anemia of Inflammation and Chronic Disease - NIH
  • Ferritin blood test
  • Hemolytic anemia
  • Iron deficiency anemia
  • Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects: Anemia - NIH - Easy-to-Read (National Cancer Institute)
  • Pernicious anemia
  • Vitamin B12 level

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Premature Babies

Also called: Preemies

Almost 1 of every 10 infants born in the United States are premature, or preemies. A premature birth is when a baby is born before 37 completed weeks of pregnancy. A full-term pregnancy is 40 weeks.

Important growth and development happen throughout pregnancy - especially in the final months and weeks. Because they are born too early, preemies weigh much less than full-term babies. They may have health problems because their organs did not have enough time to develop. Problems that a baby born too early may have include

  • Breathing problems
  • Feeding difficulties
  • Cerebral palsy
  • Developmental delay
  • Vision problems
  • Hearing problems

Preemies need special medical care in a neonatal intensive care unit, or NICU. They stay there until their organ systems can work on their own.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

  • Apnea of prematurity
  • Bronchopulmonary dysplasia
  • Intraventricular hemorrhage of the newborn
  • Necrotizing enterocolitis
  • Neonatal respiratory distress syndrome
  • Neonatal weight gain and nutrition
  • Osteopenia - premature infants
  • Premature infant
  • Preterm labor

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