ICD-10 Diagnosis Code P35.2

Congenital herpesviral [herpes simplex] infection

Diagnosis Code P35.2

ICD-10: P35.2
Short Description: Congenital herpesviral [herpes simplex] infection
Long Description: Congenital herpesviral [herpes simplex] infection
This is the 2017 version of the ICD-10-CM diagnosis code P35.2

Code Classification
  • Certain conditions originating in the perinatal period
    • Infections specific to the perinatal period (P35-P39)
      • Congenital viral diseases (P35)

Information for Patients

Herpes Simplex

Also called: HSV

Herpes is an infection that is caused by a herpes simplex virus (HSV). Oral herpes causes cold sores around the mouth or face. Genital herpes affects the genitals, buttocks or anal area. Genital herpes is a sexually transmitted disease (STD). It affects the genitals, buttocks or anal area. Other herpes infections can affect the eyes, skin, or other parts of the body. The virus can be dangerous in newborn babies or in people with weak immune systems.

There are two types of HSV:

  • HSV type 1 most commonly causes cold sores. It can also cause genital herpes.
  • HSV type 2 is the usual cause of genital herpes, but it also can infect the mouth.

HSV spreads through direct contact. Some people have no symptoms. Others get sores near the area where the virus has entered the body. They turn into blisters, become itchy and painful, and then heal.

Most people have outbreaks several times a year. Over time, you get them less often. Medicines to help your body fight the virus can help lessen symptoms and decrease outbreaks.

  • Esophagitis - infectious
  • Herpes viral culture of lesion
  • Serum herpes simplex antibodies

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Uncommon Infant and Newborn Problems

It can be scary when your baby is sick, especially when it is not an everyday problem like a cold or a fever. You may not know whether the problem is serious or how to treat it. If you have concerns about your baby's health, call your health care provider right away.

Learning information about your baby's condition can help ease your worry. Do not be afraid to ask questions about your baby's care. By working together with your health care provider, you make sure that your baby gets the best care possible.

  • Crying - excessive (0-6 months)
  • Failure to thrive
  • Hemorrhagic disease of the newborn
  • Hyperglycemia - infants
  • Neonatal respiratory distress syndrome
  • Neonatal sepsis
  • Neutropenia - infants

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