ICD-10 Diagnosis Code O91.13

Abscess of breast associated with lactation

Diagnosis Code O91.13

ICD-10: O91.13
Short Description: Abscess of breast associated with lactation
Long Description: Abscess of breast associated with lactation
This is the 2017 version of the ICD-10-CM diagnosis code O91.13

Code Classification
  • Pregnancy, childbirth and the puerperium
    • Complications predominantly related to the puerperium (O85-O92)
      • Infect of breast assoc w pregnancy, the puerp and lactation (O91)

Information for Medical Professionals

Code Edits
The following edits are applicable to this code:
Maternity diagnoses Additional informationCallout TooltipMaternity diagnoses
Maternity. Age range is 12–55 years inclusive (e.g., diabetes in pregnancy, antepartum pulmonary complication).

Diagnoses for females only Additional informationCallout TooltipDiagnoses for females only
Diagnoses for females only.

Convert to ICD-9 Additional informationCallout TooltipGeneral Equivalence Map
The ICD-10 and ICD-9 GEMs are used to facilitate linking between the diagnosis codes in ICD-9-CM and the new ICD-10-CM code set. The GEMs are the raw material from which providers, health information vendors and payers can derive specific applied mappings to meet their needs.

  • Abscess of breast associated with lactation
  • Abscess of nipple
  • Abscess of nipple associated with childbirth

Index of Diseases and Injuries
References found for the code O91.13 in the Index of Diseases and Injuries:

Information for Patients


An abscess is a pocket of pus. You can get an abscess almost anywhere in your body. When an area of your body becomes infected, your body's immune system tries to fight the infection. White blood cells go to the infected area, collect within the damaged tissue, and cause inflammation. During this process, pus forms. Pus is a mixture of living and dead white blood cells, germs, and dead tissue.

Bacteria, viruses, parasites and swallowed objects can all lead to abscesses. Skin abscesses are easy to detect. They are red, raised and painful. Abscesses inside your body may not be obvious and can damage organs, including the brain, lungs and others. Treatments include drainage and antibiotics.

  • Abscess
  • Abscess scan - radioactive
  • Amebic liver abscess
  • Anorectal abscess
  • Bartholin cyst or abscess
  • Brain abscess
  • Epidural abscess
  • Intra-abdominal abscess
  • Pancreatic abscess
  • Perirenal abscess
  • Peritonsillar abscess
  • Pilonidal cyst resection
  • Pyogenic liver abscess
  • Retropharyngeal abscess
  • Skin abscess
  • Subareolar abscess
  • Tooth abscess

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Breast Diseases

Most women experience breast changes at some time. Your age, hormone levels, and medicines you take may cause lumps, bumps, and discharges (fluids that are not breast milk).

If you have a breast lump, pain, discharge or skin irritation, see your health care provider. Minor and serious breast problems have similar symptoms. Although many women fear cancer, most breast problems are not cancer.

Some common breast changes are

  • Fibrocystic breast changes - lumpiness, thickening and swelling, often just before a woman's period
  • Cysts - fluid-filled lumps
  • Fibroadenomas - solid, round, rubbery lumps that move easily when pushed, occurring most in younger women
  • Intraductal papillomas - growths similar to warts near the nipple
  • Blocked milk ducts
  • Milk production when a woman is not breastfeeding

NIH: National Cancer Institute

  • Breast - premenstrual tenderness and swelling
  • Breast biopsy -- stereotactic
  • Breast biopsy -- ultrasound
  • Breast infection
  • Breast lump
  • Breast MRI scan
  • Breast pain
  • Breast self exam
  • Breast skin and nipple changes
  • Fibroadenoma - breast
  • Fibrocystic breast disease
  • Gynecomastia
  • Intraductal papilloma
  • Nipple problems

[Read More]
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