ICD-10 Diagnosis Code O86.29

Other urinary tract infection following delivery

Diagnosis Code O86.29

ICD-10: O86.29
Short Description: Other urinary tract infection following delivery
Long Description: Other urinary tract infection following delivery
This is the 2017 version of the ICD-10-CM diagnosis code O86.29

Code Classification
  • Pregnancy, childbirth and the puerperium
    • Complications predominantly related to the puerperium (O85-O92)
      • Other puerperal infections (O86)

Information for Patients

Postpartum Care

Also called: Post-pregnancy health

Taking home a new baby is one of the happiest times in a woman's life. But it also presents both physical and emotional challenges.

  • Get as much rest as possible. You may find that all you can do is eat, sleep, and care for your baby. And that is perfectly okay. You will have spotting or bleeding, like a menstrual period, off and on for up to six weeks.
  • You might also have swelling in your legs and feet, feel constipated, have menstrual-like cramping. Even if you are not breastfeeding, you can have milk leaking from your nipples, and your breasts might feel full, tender, or uncomfortable.
  • Follow your doctor's instructions on how much activity, like climbing stairs or walking, you can do for the next few weeks.
  • Doctors usually recommend that you abstain from sexual intercourse for four to six weeks after birth.

In addition to physical changes, you may feel sad or have the "baby blues." If you are extremely sad or are unable to care for yourself or your baby, you might have a serious condition called postpartum depression.

Dept. of Health and Human Services Office on Women's Health

  • After vaginal delivery - in the hospital
  • Losing weight after pregnancy
  • Vaginal delivery - discharge

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Urinary Tract Infections

Also called: UTI

The urinary system is the body's drainage system for removing wastes and extra water. It includes two kidneys, two ureters, a bladder, and a urethra. Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are the second most common type of infection in the body.

You may have a UTI if you notice

  • Pain or burning when you urinate
  • Fever, tiredness, or shakiness
  • An urge to urinate often
  • Pressure in your lower belly
  • Urine that smells bad or looks cloudy or reddish
  • Pain in your back or side below the ribs

People of any age or sex can get UTIs. But about four times as many women get UTIs as men. You're also at higher risk if you have diabetes, need a tube to drain your bladder, or have a spinal cord injury.

If you think you have a UTI it is important to see your doctor. Your doctor can tell if you have a UTI with a urine test. Treatment is with antibiotics.

NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

  • Asymptomatic bacteriuria
  • Catheter-associated UTI
  • Cystitis - acute
  • Leukocyte esterase urine test
  • Urinary tract infection - adults
  • Urinary tract infection - children
  • Urine - bloody
  • Urine culture

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