ICD-10 Diagnosis Code N95.2

Postmenopausal atrophic vaginitis

Diagnosis Code N95.2

ICD-10: N95.2
Short Description: Postmenopausal atrophic vaginitis
Long Description: Postmenopausal atrophic vaginitis
This is the 2017 version of the ICD-10-CM diagnosis code N95.2

Code Classification
  • Diseases of the genitourinary system
    • Noninflammatory disorders of female genital tract (N80-N98)
      • Menopausal and other perimenopausal disorders (N95)

Information for Medical Professionals

Code Edits
The following edits are applicable to this code:
Diagnoses for females only Additional informationCallout TooltipDiagnoses for females only
Diagnoses for females only.

Diagnostic Related Groups
The diagnosis code N95.2 is grouped in the following Diagnostic Related Group(s) (MS-DRG v33.0)


Convert to ICD-9 Additional informationCallout TooltipGeneral Equivalence Map
The ICD-10 and ICD-9 GEMs are used to facilitate linking between the diagnosis codes in ICD-9-CM and the new ICD-10-CM code set. The GEMs are the raw material from which providers, health information vendors and payers can derive specific applied mappings to meet their needs.
  • 627.3 - Atrophic vaginitis

  • Atrophic vaginitis
  • Atrophic vulvovaginitis
  • Atrophy of vagina
  • Perimenopausal atrophic vaginitis
  • Vaginitis
  • Vulvovaginitis

Index of Diseases and Injuries
References found for the code N95.2 in the Index of Diseases and Injuries:

Information for Patients


Also called: Change of life

Menopause is the time in a woman's life when her period stops. It usually occurs naturally, most often after age 45. Menopause happens because the woman's ovaries stop producing the hormones estrogen and progesterone.

A woman has reached menopause when she has not had a period for one year. Changes and symptoms can start several years earlier. They include

  • A change in periods - shorter or longer, lighter or heavier, with more or less time in between
  • Hot flashes and/or night sweats
  • Trouble sleeping
  • Vaginal dryness
  • Mood swings
  • Trouble focusing
  • Less hair on head, more on face

Some symptoms require treatment. Talk to your doctor about how to best manage menopause. Make sure the doctor knows your medical history and your family medical history. This includes whether you are at risk for heart disease, osteoporosis, or breast cancer.

Dept. of Health and Human Services Office on Women's Health

  • Cancer treatment -- early menopause
  • Deciding about hormone therapy
  • Menopause
  • Menopause - NIH (National Institute on Aging)
  • Types of hormone therapy

[Read More]

Vaginal Diseases

Vaginal problems are some of the most common reasons women go to the doctor. They may have symptoms such as

  • Itching
  • Burning
  • Pain
  • Abnormal bleeding
  • Discharge

Often, the problem is vaginitis, an inflammation of the vagina. The main symptom is smelly vaginal discharge, but some women have no symptoms. Common causes are bacterial infections, trichomoniasis, and yeast infections.

Some other causes of vaginal symptoms include sexually transmitted diseases, vaginal cancer, and vulvar cancer. Treatment of vaginal problems depends on the cause.

  • Bacterial Vaginosis (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)
  • Bacterial vaginosis -- aftercare
  • Bartholin cyst or abscess
  • Imperforate hymen
  • Vaginal cysts
  • Vaginal dryness
  • Vaginal itching and discharge - Adult and adolescent
  • Vaginal itching and discharge - child
  • Vaginal yeast infection
  • Vaginitis - self-care
  • Vulvovaginitis - overview

[Read More]
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