ICD-10 Diagnosis Code N81.4

Uterovaginal prolapse, unspecified

Diagnosis Code N81.4

ICD-10: N81.4
Short Description: Uterovaginal prolapse, unspecified
Long Description: Uterovaginal prolapse, unspecified
This is the 2017 version of the ICD-10-CM diagnosis code N81.4

Code Classification
  • Diseases of the genitourinary system
    • Noninflammatory disorders of female genital tract (N80-N98)
      • Female genital prolapse (N81)

Information for Medical Professionals

Code Edits
The following edits are applicable to this code:
Diagnoses for females only Additional informationCallout TooltipDiagnoses for females only
Diagnoses for females only.

Diagnostic Related Groups
The diagnosis code N81.4 is grouped in the following Diagnostic Related Group(s) (MS-DRG v33.0)


Convert to ICD-9 Additional informationCallout TooltipGeneral Equivalence Map
The ICD-10 and ICD-9 GEMs are used to facilitate linking between the diagnosis codes in ICD-9-CM and the new ICD-10-CM code set. The GEMs are the raw material from which providers, health information vendors and payers can derive specific applied mappings to meet their needs.
  • 618.4 - Utervaginal prolapse NOS

  • Cystocele with unspecified uterine prolapse
  • Uterine prolapse
  • Uterine prolapse
  • Uterine prolapse in pregnancy
  • Uterovaginal prolapse

Index of Diseases and Injuries
References found for the code N81.4 in the Index of Diseases and Injuries:

Information for Patients

Cervix Disorders

The cervix is the lower part of the uterus, the place where a baby grows during pregnancy. The cervix has a small opening that expands during childbirth. It also allows menstrual blood to leave a woman's body.

Your health care provider may perform a Pap test during your health checkup to look for changes to the cells of the cervix, including cervical cancer. Other problems with the cervix include:

  • Cervicitis - inflammation of the cervix. This is usually from an infection.
  • Cervical incompetence - This can happen during pregnancy. The opening of the cervix widens long before the baby is due.
  • Cervical polyps and cysts - abnormal growths on the cervix

  • Cervical dysplasia
  • Cervical polyps
  • Cervicitis
  • Cervix treatment - cryosurgery
  • Cold knife cone biopsy
  • Endocervical gram stain
  • Insufficient cervix
  • Nabothian cyst

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Pelvic Support Problems

Also called: Cystocele, Enterocele, Pelvic prolapse, Rectocele

The pelvic floor is a group of muscles and other tissues that form a sling or hammock across the pelvis. In women, it holds the uterus, bladder, bowel, and other pelvic organs in place so that they can work properly. The pelvic floor can become weak or be injured. The main causes are pregnancy and childbirth. Other causes include being overweight, radiation treatment, surgery, and getting older.

Common symptoms include

  • Feeling heaviness, fullness, pulling, or aching in the vagina. It gets worse by the end of the day or during a bowel movement.
  • Seeing or feeling a "bulge" or "something coming out" of the vagina
  • Having a hard time starting to urinate or emptying the bladder completely
  • Having frequent urinary tract infections
  • Leaking urine when you cough, laugh, or exercise
  • Feeling an urgent or frequent need to urinate
  • Feeling pain while urinating
  • Leaking stool or having a hard time controlling gas
  • Being constipated
  • Having a hard time making it to the bathroom in time

Your health care provider diagnoses the problem with a physical exam, a pelvic exam, or special tests. Treatments include special pelvic muscle exercises called Kegel exercises. A mechanical support device called a pessary helps some women. Surgery and medicines are other treatments.

NIH: National Institute of Child Health and Human Development

  • Anterior vaginal wall repair
  • Pelvic floor muscle training exercises
  • Rectal prolapse
  • Urinary Retention - NIH (National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases)
  • Uterine prolapse

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