ICD-10 Diagnosis Code N75.1

Abscess of Bartholin's gland

Diagnosis Code N75.1

ICD-10: N75.1
Short Description: Abscess of Bartholin's gland
Long Description: Abscess of Bartholin's gland
This is the 2017 version of the ICD-10-CM diagnosis code N75.1

Code Classification
  • Diseases of the genitourinary system
    • Inflammatory diseases of female pelvic organs (N70-N77)
      • Diseases of Bartholin's gland (N75)

Information for Medical Professionals

Code Edits
The following edits are applicable to this code:
Diagnoses for females only Additional informationCallout TooltipDiagnoses for females only
Diagnoses for females only.

Diagnostic Related Groups
The diagnosis code N75.1 is grouped in the following Diagnostic Related Group(s) (MS-DRG v33.0)


Convert to ICD-9 Additional informationCallout TooltipGeneral Equivalence Map
The ICD-10 and ICD-9 GEMs are used to facilitate linking between the diagnosis codes in ICD-9-CM and the new ICD-10-CM code set. The GEMs are the raw material from which providers, health information vendors and payers can derive specific applied mappings to meet their needs.
  • 616.3 - Bartholin's glnd abscess

  • Abscess gonococcal
  • Abscess of Bartholin's gland
  • Abscess of female genital structure
  • Abscess of vulva
  • Gonococcal Bartholin's gland abscess

Information for Patients


An abscess is a pocket of pus. You can get an abscess almost anywhere in your body. When an area of your body becomes infected, your body's immune system tries to fight the infection. White blood cells go to the infected area, collect within the damaged tissue, and cause inflammation. During this process, pus forms. Pus is a mixture of living and dead white blood cells, germs, and dead tissue.

Bacteria, viruses, parasites and swallowed objects can all lead to abscesses. Skin abscesses are easy to detect. They are red, raised and painful. Abscesses inside your body may not be obvious and can damage organs, including the brain, lungs and others. Treatments include drainage and antibiotics.

  • Abscess
  • Abscess scan - radioactive
  • Amebic liver abscess
  • Anorectal abscess
  • Bartholin cyst or abscess
  • Brain abscess
  • Epidural abscess
  • Intra-abdominal abscess
  • Pancreatic abscess
  • Perirenal abscess
  • Peritonsillar abscess
  • Pilonidal cyst resection
  • Pyogenic liver abscess
  • Retropharyngeal abscess
  • Skin abscess
  • Subareolar abscess
  • Tooth abscess

[Read More]

Vaginal Diseases

Vaginal problems are some of the most common reasons women go to the doctor. They may have symptoms such as

  • Itching
  • Burning
  • Pain
  • Abnormal bleeding
  • Discharge

Often, the problem is vaginitis, an inflammation of the vagina. The main symptom is smelly vaginal discharge, but some women have no symptoms. Common causes are bacterial infections, trichomoniasis, and yeast infections.

Some other causes of vaginal symptoms include sexually transmitted diseases, vaginal cancer, and vulvar cancer. Treatment of vaginal problems depends on the cause.

  • Bacterial Vaginosis (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)
  • Bacterial vaginosis -- aftercare
  • Bartholin cyst or abscess
  • Imperforate hymen
  • Vaginal cysts
  • Vaginal dryness
  • Vaginal itching and discharge - Adult and adolescent
  • Vaginal itching and discharge - child
  • Vaginal yeast infection
  • Vaginitis - self-care
  • Vulvovaginitis - overview

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Vulvar Disorders

The vulva is the external part of a woman's genitals. Some problems you can have with the vulvar area include

  • Bacterial or fungal infections
  • Skin problems due to allergy
  • Vulvar cancer
  • Vulvodynia, or vulvar pain

Symptoms may include redness, itching, pain, or cracks in the skin. Treatment depends on the cause.

  • Vulvovaginitis - overview

[Read More]
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