ICD-10 Diagnosis Code N02.1

Recur and perst hematur w focal and seg glomerular lesions

Diagnosis Code N02.1

ICD-10: N02.1
Short Description: Recur and perst hematur w focal and seg glomerular lesions
Long Description: Recurrent and persistent hematuria with focal and segmental glomerular lesions
This is the 2017 version of the ICD-10-CM diagnosis code N02.1

Code Classification
  • Diseases of the genitourinary system
    • Glomerular diseases (N00-N08)
      • Recurrent and persistent hematuria (N02)

Information for Medical Professionals

Diagnostic Related Groups
The diagnosis code N02.1 is grouped in the following Diagnostic Related Group(s) (MS-DRG v33.0)


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Index of Diseases and Injuries
References found for the code N02.1 in the Index of Diseases and Injuries:

Information for Patients

Kidney Diseases

Also called: Renal disease

You have two kidneys, each about the size of your fist. They are near the middle of your back, just below the rib cage. Inside each kidney there are about a million tiny structures called nephrons. They filter your blood. They remove wastes and extra water, which become urine. The urine flows through tubes called ureters. It goes to your bladder, which stores the urine until you go to the bathroom.

Most kidney diseases attack the nephrons. This damage may leave kidneys unable to remove wastes. Causes can include genetic problems, injuries, or medicines. You have a higher risk of kidney disease if you have diabetes, high blood pressure, or a close family member with kidney disease. Chronic kidney disease damages the nephrons slowly over several years. Other kidney problems include

  • Cancer
  • Cysts
  • Stones
  • Infections

Your doctor can do blood and urine tests to check if you have kidney disease. If your kidneys fail, you will need dialysis or a kidney transplant.

NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

  • ACE inhibitors
  • Acute nephritic syndrome
  • Analgesic nephropathy
  • Atheroembolic renal disease
  • Bartter syndrome
  • Bilateral hydronephrosis
  • Congenital nephrotic syndrome
  • Distal renal tubular acidosis
  • Focal segmental glomerulosclerosis
  • Glomerulonephritis
  • Goodpasture syndrome
  • IgA nephropathy
  • Injury - kidney and ureter
  • Interstitial nephritis
  • Kidney removal
  • Kidney removal - discharge
  • Medicines and Kidney Disease - NIH (National Kidney Disease Education Program)
  • Membranoproliferative GN I
  • Membranous nephropathy
  • Minimal change disease
  • Nephrocalcinosis
  • Nephrotic syndrome
  • Obstructive uropathy
  • Perirenal abscess
  • Proximal renal tubular acidosis
  • Reflux nephropathy
  • Renal papillary necrosis
  • Renal perfusion scintiscan
  • Renal vein thrombosis
  • Unilateral hydronephrosis

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Urine and Urination

Your kidneys make urine by filtering wastes and extra water from your blood. The waste is called urea. Your blood carries it to the kidneys. From the kidneys, urine travels down two thin tubes called ureters to the bladder. The bladder stores urine until you are ready to urinate. It swells into a round shape when it is full and gets smaller when empty. If your urinary system is healthy, your bladder can hold up to 16 ounces (2 cups) of urine comfortably for 2 to 5 hours.

You may have problems with urination if you have

  • Kidney failure
  • Urinary tract infections
  • An enlarged prostate
  • Bladder control problems like incontinence, overactive bladder, or interstitial cystitis
  • A blockage that prevents you from emptying your bladder

Some conditions may also cause you to have blood or protein in your urine. If you have a urinary problem, see your healthcare provider. Urinalysis and other urine tests can help to diagnose the problem. Treatment depends on the cause.

NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

  • Clean catch urine sample
  • Frequent or urgent urination
  • RBC urine test
  • Urinalysis
  • Urinary catheters
  • Urinary Retention - NIH (National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases)
  • Urinating more at night
  • Urination - difficulty with flow
  • Urination - painful
  • Urine - bloody
  • Urine 24-hour volume
  • Urine odor

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