ICD-10 Diagnosis Code M71.572

Oth bursitis, not elsewhere classified, left ankle and foot

Diagnosis Code M71.572

ICD-10: M71.572
Short Description: Oth bursitis, not elsewhere classified, left ankle and foot
Long Description: Other bursitis, not elsewhere classified, left ankle and foot
This is the 2017 version of the ICD-10-CM diagnosis code M71.572

Code Classification
  • Diseases of the musculoskeletal system and connective tissue
    • Other soft tissue disorders (M70-M79)
      • Other bursopathies (M71)

Information for Patients

Ankle Injuries and Disorders

Your ankle bone and the ends of your two lower leg bones make up the ankle joint. Your ligaments, which connect bones to one another, stabilize and support it. Your muscles and tendons move it.

The most common ankle problems are sprains and fractures. A sprain is an injury to the ligaments. It may take a few weeks to many months to heal completely. A fracture is a break in a bone. You can also injure other parts of the ankle such as tendons, which join muscles to bone, and cartilage, which cushions your joints. Ankle sprains and fractures are common sports injuries.

  • Ankle arthroscopy
  • Ankle fracture - aftercare
  • Ankle pain
  • Ankle replacement
  • Ankle sprain - aftercare
  • Foot, leg, and ankle swelling

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A bursa is a small, fluid-filled sac that acts as a cushion between a bone and other moving parts, such as muscles, tendons, or skin. Bursitis occurs when a bursa becomes inflamed. People get bursitis by overusing a joint. It can also be caused by an injury. It usually occurs at the knee or elbow. Kneeling or leaning your elbows on a hard surface for a long time can make bursitis start. Doing the same kinds of movements every day or putting stress on joints increases your risk.

Symptoms of bursitis include pain and swelling. Your doctor will diagnose bursitis with a physical exam and tests such as x-rays and MRIs. He or she may also take fluid from the swollen area to be sure the problem isn't an infection.

Treatment of bursitis includes rest, pain medicines, or ice. If there is no improvement, your doctor may inject a drug into the area around the swollen bursa. If the joint still does not improve after 6 to 12 months, you may need surgery to repair damage and relieve pressure on the bursa.

NIH: National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases

  • Bursitis
  • Bursitis of the heel
  • Trochanteric bursitis
  • What Are Bursitis and Tendinitis? - NIH - Easy-to-Read (National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases)

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Foot Injuries and Disorders

Each of your feet has 26 bones, 33 joints, and more than 100 tendons, muscles, and ligaments. No wonder a lot of things can go wrong. Here are a few common problems:

  • Bunions - hard, painful bumps on the big toe joint
  • Corns and calluses - thickened skin from friction or pressure
  • Plantar warts - warts on the soles of your feet
  • Fallen arches - also called flat feet

Ill-fitting shoes often cause these problems. Aging and being overweight also increase your chances of having foot problems.

  • Claw foot
  • Clubfoot
  • Common peroneal nerve dysfunction
  • Extremity x-ray
  • Flat feet
  • Foot pain
  • Foot sprain - aftercare
  • Foot, leg, and ankle swelling
  • Hand or foot spasms
  • High arch
  • Metatarsal fracture (acute) - aftercare
  • Metatarsal stress fractures - aftercare
  • Metatarsus adductus
  • Morton neuroma

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