ICD-10 Diagnosis Code M34.2

Systemic sclerosis induced by drug and chemical

Diagnosis Code M34.2

ICD-10: M34.2
Short Description: Systemic sclerosis induced by drug and chemical
Long Description: Systemic sclerosis induced by drug and chemical
This is the 2017 version of the ICD-10-CM diagnosis code M34.2

Valid for Submission
The code M34.2 is valid for submission for HIPAA-covered transactions.

Code Classification
  • Diseases of the musculoskeletal system and connective tissue (M00–M99)
    • Systemic connective tissue disorders (M30-M36)
      • Systemic sclerosis [scleroderma] (M34)

Information for Medical Professionals

Diagnostic Related Groups
The diagnosis code M34.2 is grouped in the following Diagnostic Related Group(s) (MS-DRG V34.0)

  • 545 - CONNECTIVE TISSUE DISORDERS WITH MCC
  • 546 - CONNECTIVE TISSUE DISORDERS WITH CC
  • 547 - CONNECTIVE TISSUE DISORDERS WITHOUT CC/MCC

Convert to ICD-9 Additional informationCallout TooltipGeneral Equivalence Map
The ICD-10 and ICD-9 GEMs are used to facilitate linking between the diagnosis codes in ICD-9-CM and the new ICD-10-CM code set. The GEMs are the raw material from which providers, health information vendors and payers can derive specific applied mappings to meet their needs.

Synonyms
  • Systemic sclerosis caused by chemical
  • Systemic sclerosis induced by drugs and chemicals

Index of Diseases and Injuries
References found for the code M34.2 in the Index of Diseases and Injuries:


Information for Patients


Scleroderma

Also called: Circumscribed scleroderma, Dermatosclerosis, Morphea, Systemic sclerosis

Scleroderma means hard skin. It is a group of diseases that cause abnormal growth of connective tissue. Connective tissue is the material inside your body that gives your tissues their shape and helps keep them strong. In scleroderma, the tissue gets hard or thick. It can cause swelling or pain in your muscles and joints.

Symptoms of scleroderma include

  • Calcium deposits in connective tissues
  • Raynaud's phenomenon, a narrowing of blood vessels in the hands or feet
  • Swelling of the esophagus, the tube between your throat and stomach
  • Thick, tight skin on your fingers
  • Red spots on your hands and face

No one knows what causes scleroderma. It is more common in women. It can be mild or severe. Doctors diagnose scleroderma using your medical history, a physical exam, lab tests, and a skin biopsy. There is no cure, but various treatments can control symptoms and complications.

NIH: National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases

  • Collagen vascular disease (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Scleroderma (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Swallowing problems (Medical Encyclopedia)


[Read More]
Previous Code
Previous Code M34.1
Next Code
M34.8 Next Code