ICD-10 Diagnosis Code M30.1

Polyarteritis with lung involvement [Churg-Strauss]

Diagnosis Code M30.1

ICD-10: M30.1
Short Description: Polyarteritis with lung involvement [Churg-Strauss]
Long Description: Polyarteritis with lung involvement [Churg-Strauss]
This is the 2017 version of the ICD-10-CM diagnosis code M30.1

Valid for Submission
The code M30.1 is valid for submission for HIPAA-covered transactions.

Code Classification
  • Diseases of the musculoskeletal system and connective tissue (M00–M99)
    • Systemic connective tissue disorders (M30-M36)
      • Polyarteritis nodosa and related conditions (M30)

Information for Medical Professionals

Diagnostic Related Groups
The diagnosis code M30.1 is grouped in the following Diagnostic Related Group(s) (MS-DRG v33.0)

  • PATHOLOGICAL FRACTURES AND MUSCULOSKELETAL AND CONNECTIVE TISSUE MALIGNANCY WITH MCC 542
  • PATHOLOGICAL FRACTURES AND MUSCULOSKELETAL AND CONNECTIVE TISSUE MALIGNANCY WITH CC 543
  • PATHOLOGICAL FRACTURES AND MUSCULOSKELETAL AND CONNECTIVE TISSUE MALIGNANCY WITHOUT CC/MCC 544

Convert to ICD-9 Additional informationCallout TooltipGeneral Equivalence Map
The ICD-10 and ICD-9 GEMs are used to facilitate linking between the diagnosis codes in ICD-9-CM and the new ICD-10-CM code set. The GEMs are the raw material from which providers, health information vendors and payers can derive specific applied mappings to meet their needs.

Synonyms
  • Allergic granulomatosis angiitis
  • Hypersensitivity angiitis
  • Lung disorder due to autoimmune disorder
  • Necrosis of artery
  • Primary necrotizing vasculitis with granulomata
  • Pulmonary disease due to allergic granulomatosis angiitis

Index of Diseases and Injuries
References found for the code M30.1 in the Index of Diseases and Injuries:


Information for Patients


Eosinophilic Disorders

Also called: Eosinophilia

Eosinophils are a type of white blood cell. They help fight off infections and play a role in your body's immune response. They can also build up and cause inflammation.

Normally your blood doesn't have a large number of eosinophils. Your body may produce more of them in response to

  • Allergic disorders
  • Skin conditions
  • Parasitic and fungal infections
  • Autoimmune diseases
  • Some cancers
  • Bone marrow disorders

In some conditions, the eosinophils can move outside the bloodstream and build up in organs and tissues. Treatment of the problem depends on the cause.

  • Eosinophil count - absolute
  • Eosinophilic fasciitis
  • Simple pulmonary eosinophilia


[Read More]

Vasculitis

Also called: Angiitis

Vasculitis is an inflammation of the blood vessels. It happens when the body's immune system attacks the blood vessel by mistake. It can happen because of an infection, a medicine, or another disease. The cause is often unknown.

Vasculitis can affect arteries, veins and capillaries. Arteries are vessels that carry blood from the heart to the body's organs. Veins are the vessels that carry blood back to the heart. Capillaries are tiny blood vessels that connect the small arteries and veins.

When a blood vessel becomes inflamed, it can

  • Narrow, making it more difficult for blood to get through
  • Close off completely so that blood can't get through
  • Stretch and weaken so much that it bulges. The bulge is called an aneurysm. If it bursts, it can cause dangerous bleeding inside the body.

Symptoms of vasculitis can vary, but usually include fever, swelling and a general sense of feeling ill. The main goal of treatment is to stop the inflammation. Steroids and other medicines to stop inflammation are often helpful.

NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

  • Allergic vasculitis
  • Aortic angiography
  • Cerebral angiography
  • Henoch-Schonlein purpura
  • Necrotizing vasculitis
  • Polyarteritis nodosa
  • Takayasu arteritis


[Read More]
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