ICD-10 Diagnosis Code L81.3

Cafe au lait spots

Diagnosis Code L81.3

ICD-10: L81.3
Short Description: Cafe au lait spots
Long Description: Cafe au lait spots
This is the 2017 version of the ICD-10-CM diagnosis code L81.3

Code Classification
  • Diseases of the skin and subcutaneous tissue
    • Other disorders of the skin and subcutaneous tissue (L80-L99)
      • Other disorders of pigmentation (L81)

Information for Medical Professionals

Diagnostic Related Groups
The diagnosis code L81.3 is grouped in the following Diagnostic Related Group(s) (MS-DRG v33.0)


Convert to ICD-9 Additional informationCallout TooltipGeneral Equivalence Map
The ICD-10 and ICD-9 GEMs are used to facilitate linking between the diagnosis codes in ICD-9-CM and the new ICD-10-CM code set. The GEMs are the raw material from which providers, health information vendors and payers can derive specific applied mappings to meet their needs.

  • Anomaly of chromosome pair 11
  • Café au lait spot
  • Café-au-lait macules with pulmonary stenosis
  • Café-au-lait macules with temporal dysrhythmia
  • Café-au-lait spots and ring chromosome 11
  • Familial multiple café-au-lait macules without neurofibromatosis
  • Multiple café-au-lait macules due to neurofibromatosis
  • Neurofibromatosis, type 1
  • Ring chromosome 11 syndrome

Information for Patients


Also called: Cafe au lait spot, Hemangioma, Mongolian spot, Nevus, Strawberry mark

Birthmarks are abnormalities of the skin that are present when a baby is born. There are two types of birthmarks. Vascular birthmarks are made up of blood vessels that haven't formed correctly. They are usually red. Two types of vascular birthmarks are hemangiomas and port-wine stains. Pigmented birthmarks are made of a cluster of pigment cells which cause color in skin. They can be many different colors, from tan to brown, gray to black, or even blue. Moles can be birthmarks.

No one knows what causes many types of birthmarks, but some run in families. Your baby's doctor will look at the birthmark to see if it needs any treatment or if it should be watched. Pigmented birthmarks aren't usually treated, except for moles. Treatment for vascular birthmarks includes laser surgery.

Most birthmarks are not serious, and some go away on their own. Some stay the same or get worse as you get older. Usually birthmarks are only a concern for your appearance. But certain types can increase your risk of skin cancer. If your birthmark bleeds, hurts, itches, or becomes infected, call your health care provider.

  • Birthmarks - pigmented
  • Birthmarks - red
  • Cherry angioma
  • Hemangioma
  • Mongolian blue spots
  • Port-wine stain
  • Stork bite

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