ICD-10 Diagnosis Code L02.8

Cutaneous abscess, furuncle and carbuncle of other sites

Diagnosis Code L02.8

ICD-10: L02.8
Short Description: Cutaneous abscess, furuncle and carbuncle of other sites
Long Description: Cutaneous abscess, furuncle and carbuncle of other sites
This is the 2018 version of the ICD-10-CM diagnosis code L02.8

Not Valid for Submission
The code L02.8 is a "header" and not valid for submission for HIPAA-covered transactions.

Code Classification
  • Diseases of the skin and subcutaneous tissue (L00–L99)
    • Infections of the skin and subcutaneous tissue (L00-L08)
      • Cutaneous abscess, furuncle and carbuncle (L02)

Information for Patients


Abscess

An abscess is a pocket of pus. You can get an abscess almost anywhere in your body. When an area of your body becomes infected, your body's immune system tries to fight the infection. White blood cells go to the infected area, collect within the damaged tissue, and cause inflammation. During this process, pus forms. Pus is a mixture of living and dead white blood cells, germs, and dead tissue.

Bacteria, viruses, parasites and swallowed objects can all lead to abscesses. Skin abscesses are easy to detect. They are red, raised and painful. Abscesses inside your body may not be obvious and can damage organs, including the brain, lungs and others. Treatments include drainage and antibiotics.

  • Abscess (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Abscess scan - radioactive (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Amebic liver abscess (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Anorectal abscess (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Bartholin cyst or abscess (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Brain abscess (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Epidural abscess (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Intra-abdominal abscess (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Pancreatic abscess (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Perirenal abscess (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Peritonsillar abscess (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Pilonidal cyst resection (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Pyogenic liver abscess (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Retropharyngeal abscess (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Skin abscess (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Subareolar abscess (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Tooth abscess (Medical Encyclopedia)


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Skin Conditions

Also called: Cutaneous disorders, Dermatologic disorders

Your skin is your body's largest organ. It covers and protects your body. Your skin

  • Holds body fluids in, preventing dehydration
  • Keeps harmful microbes out, preventing infections
  • Helps you feel things like heat, cold, and pain
  • Keeps your body temperature even
  • Makes vitamin D when the sun shines on it

Anything that irritates, clogs, or inflames your skin can cause symptoms such as redness, swelling, burning, and itching. Allergies, irritants, your genetic makeup, and certain diseases and immune system problems can cause rashes, hives, and other skin conditions. Many skin problems, such as acne, also affect your appearance.

NIH: National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases

  • Acrodermatitis (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Cryotherapy (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Cutaneous skin tags (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Dry skin -- self-care (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Erythema multiforme (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Granuloma annulare (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Keratosis pilaris (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Lichen planus (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Milia (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Sebaceous cyst (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Seborrheic keratosis (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Skin lesion removal (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Skin lesion removal-aftercare (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Stasis dermatitis and ulcers (Medical Encyclopedia)


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Staphylococcal Infections

Also called: Staph

Staph is short for Staphylococcus, a type of bacteria. There are over 30 types, but Staphylococcus aureus causes most staph infections (pronounced "staff infections"), including

  • Skin infections
  • Pneumonia
  • Food poisoning
  • Toxic shock syndrome
  • Blood poisoning (bacteremia)

Skin infections are the most common. They can look like pimples or boils. They may be red, swollen and painful, and sometimes have pus or other drainage. They can turn into impetigo, which turns into a crust on the skin, or cellulitis, a swollen, red area of skin that feels hot.

Anyone can get a staph skin infection. You are more likely to get one if you have a cut or scratch, or have contact with a person or surface that has staph bacteria. The best way to prevent staph is to keep hands and wounds clean. Most staph skin infections are easily treated with antibiotics or by draining the infection. Some staph bacteria such as MRSA (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus) are resistant to certain antibiotics, making infections harder to treat.

  • Boils (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Carbuncle (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Scalded skin syndrome (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Staph infections -- self-care at home (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Toxic shock syndrome (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Tracheitis (Medical Encyclopedia)


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