ICD-10 Diagnosis Code K87

Disord of GB, biliary trac and pancreas in dis classd elswhr

Diagnosis Code K87

ICD-10: K87
Short Description: Disord of GB, biliary trac and pancreas in dis classd elswhr
Long Description: Disorders of gallbladder, biliary tract and pancreas in diseases classified elsewhere
This is the 2017 version of the ICD-10-CM diagnosis code K87

Code Classification
  • Diseases of the digestive system
    • Disorders of gallbladder, biliary tract and pancreas (K80-K87)
      • Disord of GB, biliary trac and pancreas in dis classd elswhr (K87)

Information for Medical Professionals

Code Edits
The following edits are applicable to this code:
Manifestation diagnoses Additional informationCallout TooltipManifestation diagnoses
Manifestation codes describe the manifestation of an underlying disease, not the disease itself, and therefore should not be used as a principal diagnosis.

Diagnostic Related Groups
The diagnosis code K87 is grouped in the following Diagnostic Related Group(s) (MS-DRG v33.0)


Convert to ICD-9 Additional informationCallout TooltipGeneral Equivalence Map
The ICD-10 and ICD-9 GEMs are used to facilitate linking between the diagnosis codes in ICD-9-CM and the new ICD-10-CM code set. The GEMs are the raw material from which providers, health information vendors and payers can derive specific applied mappings to meet their needs.

Index of Diseases and Injuries
References found for the code K87 in the Index of Diseases and Injuries:

Information for Patients

Bile Duct Diseases

Your liver makes a digestive juice called bile. Your gallbladder stores it between meals. When you eat, your gallbladder pushes the bile into tubes called bile ducts. They carry the bile to your small intestine. The bile helps break down fat. It also helps the liver get rid of toxins and wastes.

Different diseases can block the bile ducts and cause a problem with the flow of bile:

  • Gallstones, which can increase pressure in the gallbladder and cause a gallbladder attack. The pain usually lasts from one to several hours.
  • Cancer
  • Infections
  • Birth defects, such as biliary atresia. It is the most common reason for liver transplants in children in the United States.
  • Inflammation, which can cause scarring. Over time, this can lead to liver failure.

NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

  • ALP - blood test
  • Bile duct obstruction
  • Biliary atresia
  • Biliary stricture
  • Cholangitis
  • Cholestasis
  • ERCP
  • Gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT) blood test
  • Primary biliary cirrhosis

[Read More]

Gallbladder Diseases

Your gallbladder is a pear-shaped organ under your liver. It stores bile, a fluid made by your liver to digest fat. As your stomach and intestines digest food, your gallbladder releases bile through a tube called the common bile duct. The duct connects your gallbladder and liver to your small intestine.

Your gallbladder is most likely to give you trouble if something blocks the flow of bile through the bile ducts. That is usually a gallstone. Gallstones form when substances in bile harden. Rarely, you can also get cancer in your gallbladder.

Many gallbladder problems get better with removal of the gallbladder. Fortunately, you can live without a gallbladder. Bile has other ways of reaching your small intestine.

  • Acute cholecystitis
  • Bilirubin - urine
  • Chronic cholecystitis
  • Gallbladder removal - laparoscopic
  • Gallbladder removal - laparoscopic - discharge
  • Gallbladder removal - open

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Pancreatic Diseases

The pancreas is a gland behind your stomach and in front of your spine. It produces juices that help break down food and hormones that help control blood sugar levels. Problems with the pancreas can lead to many health problems. These include

  • Pancreatitis, or inflammation of the pancreas: This happens when digestive enzymes start digesting the pancreas itself
  • Pancreatic cancer
  • Cystic fibrosis, a genetic disorder in which thick, sticky mucus can also block tubes in your pancreas

The pancreas also plays a role in diabetes. In type 1 diabetes, the beta cells of the pancreas no longer make insulin because the body's immune system has attacked them. In type 2 diabetes, the pancreas loses the ability to secrete enough insulin in response to meals.

  • Acute pancreatitis
  • Amylase - blood
  • Annular pancreas
  • ERCP
  • Lipase test
  • Pancreatic pseudocyst
  • Zollinger-Ellison syndrome

[Read More]
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