ICD-10 Diagnosis Code K51.014

Ulcerative (chronic) pancolitis with abscess

Diagnosis Code K51.014

ICD-10: K51.014
Short Description: Ulcerative (chronic) pancolitis with abscess
Long Description: Ulcerative (chronic) pancolitis with abscess
This is the 2018 version of the ICD-10-CM diagnosis code K51.014

Valid for Submission
The code K51.014 is valid for submission for HIPAA-covered transactions.

Code Classification
  • Diseases of the digestive system (K00–K93)
    • Noninfective enteritis and colitis (K50-K52)
      • Ulcerative colitis (K51)

Information for Medical Professionals

Diagnostic Related Groups
The diagnosis code K51.014 is grouped in the following Diagnostic Related Group(s) (MS-DRG V34.0)

  • 385 - INFLAMMATORY BOWEL DISEASE WITH MCC
  • 386 - INFLAMMATORY BOWEL DISEASE WITH CC
  • 387 - INFLAMMATORY BOWEL DISEASE WITHOUT CC/MCC

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The ICD-10 and ICD-9 GEMs are used to facilitate linking between the diagnosis codes in ICD-9-CM and the new ICD-10-CM code set. The GEMs are the raw material from which providers, health information vendors and payers can derive specific applied mappings to meet their needs.

Synonyms
  • Abscess of intestine co-occurrent and due to chronic ulcerative pancolitis
  • Abscess of intestine co-occurrent and due to ulcerative colitis
  • Chronic ulcerative colitis
  • Chronic ulcerative pancolitis
  • Ulcerative pancolitis

Information for Patients


Abscess

An abscess is a pocket of pus. You can get an abscess almost anywhere in your body. When an area of your body becomes infected, your body's immune system tries to fight the infection. White blood cells go to the infected area, collect within the damaged tissue, and cause inflammation. During this process, pus forms. Pus is a mixture of living and dead white blood cells, germs, and dead tissue.

Bacteria, viruses, parasites and swallowed objects can all lead to abscesses. Skin abscesses are easy to detect. They are red, raised and painful. Abscesses inside your body may not be obvious and can damage organs, including the brain, lungs and others. Treatments include drainage and antibiotics.

  • Abscess (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Abscess scan - radioactive (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Amebic liver abscess (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Anorectal abscess (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Bartholin cyst or abscess (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Brain abscess (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Epidural abscess (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Intra-abdominal abscess (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Pancreatic abscess (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Perirenal abscess (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Peritonsillar abscess (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Pilonidal cyst resection (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Pyogenic liver abscess (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Retropharyngeal abscess (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Skin abscess (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Subareolar abscess (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Tooth abscess (Medical Encyclopedia)


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Ulcerative Colitis

Also called: Colitis, Distal colitis, Pancolitis, Ulcerative proctitis

Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a disease that causes inflammation and sores, called ulcers, in the lining of the rectum and colon. It is one of a group of diseases called inflammatory bowel disease.

UC can happen at any age, but it usually starts between the ages of 15 and 30. It tends to run in families. The most common symptoms are pain in the abdomen and blood or pus in diarrhea. Other symptoms may include

  • Anemia
  • Severe tiredness
  • Weight loss
  • Loss of appetite
  • Bleeding from the rectum
  • Sores on the skin
  • Joint pain
  • Growth failure in children

About half of people with UC have mild symptoms.

Doctors use blood tests, stool tests, colonoscopy or sigmoidoscopy, and imaging tests to diagnose UC. Several types of drugs can help control it. Some people have long periods of remission, when they are free of symptoms. In severe cases, doctors must remove the colon.

NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

  • Colonoscopy (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Large bowel resection (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Low-fiber diet (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Lower GI Series - NIH (National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases)
  • Ulcerative colitis (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Ulcerative Colitis - children - discharge (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Ulcerative colitis - discharge (Medical Encyclopedia)


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Ulcerative colitis Ulcerative colitis is a chronic disorder that affects the digestive system. This condition is characterized by abnormal inflammation of the inner surface of the rectum and colon, which make up most of the length of the large intestine. The inflammation usually causes open sores (ulcers) to develop in the large intestine. Ulcerative colitis usually appears between ages 15 and 30, although it can develop at any age. The inflammation tends to flare up multiple times throughout life, which causes recurring signs and symptoms.The most common symptoms of ulcerative colitis are abdominal pain and cramping and frequent diarrhea, often with blood, pus, or mucus in the stool. Other signs and symptoms include nausea, loss of appetite, fatigue, and fevers. Chronic bleeding from the inflamed and ulcerated intestinal tissue can cause a shortage of red blood cells (anemia) in some affected individuals. People with this disorder have difficulty absorbing enough fluids and nutrients from their diet and often experience weight loss. Affected children usually grow more slowly than normal. Less commonly, ulcerative colitis causes problems with the skin, joints, eyes, kidneys, or liver, which are most likely due to abnormal inflammation.Toxic megacolon is a rare complication of ulcerative colitis that can be life-threatening. Toxic megacolon involves widening of the colon and an overwhelming bacterial infection (sepsis). Ulcerative colitis also increases the risk of developing colon cancer, especially in people whose entire colon is inflamed and in people who have had ulcerative colitis for 8 or more years.Ulcerative colitis is one common form of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Another type of IBD, Crohn disease, also causes chronic inflammation of the intestines. Unlike ulcerative colitis, which affects only the inner surface of the large intestine, Crohn disease can cause inflammation in any part of the digestive system, and the inflammation extends deeper into the intestinal tissue.
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