ICD-10 Diagnosis Code J85.1

Abscess of lung with pneumonia

Diagnosis Code J85.1

ICD-10: J85.1
Short Description: Abscess of lung with pneumonia
Long Description: Abscess of lung with pneumonia
This is the 2017 version of the ICD-10-CM diagnosis code J85.1

Code Classification
  • Diseases of the respiratory system
    • Suppurative and necrotic conditions of the lower respiratory tract (J85-J86)
      • Abscess of lung and mediastinum (J85)

Information for Medical Professionals

Diagnostic Related Groups
The diagnosis code J85.1 is grouped in the following Diagnostic Related Group(s) (MS-DRG v33.0)


Convert to ICD-9 Additional informationCallout TooltipGeneral Equivalence Map
The ICD-10 and ICD-9 GEMs are used to facilitate linking between the diagnosis codes in ICD-9-CM and the new ICD-10-CM code set. The GEMs are the raw material from which providers, health information vendors and payers can derive specific applied mappings to meet their needs.

  • Abscess of lung
  • Abscess of lung with pneumonia
  • Confluent bronchopneumonia with abscess formation

Index of Diseases and Injuries
References found for the code J85.1 in the Index of Diseases and Injuries:

Information for Patients


An abscess is a pocket of pus. You can get an abscess almost anywhere in your body. When an area of your body becomes infected, your body's immune system tries to fight the infection. White blood cells go to the infected area, collect within the damaged tissue, and cause inflammation. During this process, pus forms. Pus is a mixture of living and dead white blood cells, germs, and dead tissue.

Bacteria, viruses, parasites and swallowed objects can all lead to abscesses. Skin abscesses are easy to detect. They are red, raised and painful. Abscesses inside your body may not be obvious and can damage organs, including the brain, lungs and others. Treatments include drainage and antibiotics.

  • Abscess
  • Abscess scan - radioactive
  • Amebic liver abscess
  • Anorectal abscess
  • Bartholin cyst or abscess
  • Brain abscess
  • Epidural abscess
  • Intra-abdominal abscess
  • Pancreatic abscess
  • Perirenal abscess
  • Peritonsillar abscess
  • Pilonidal cyst resection
  • Pyogenic liver abscess
  • Retropharyngeal abscess
  • Skin abscess
  • Subareolar abscess
  • Tooth abscess

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Also called: Bronchopneumonia

Pneumonia is an infection in one or both of the lungs. Many germs, such as bacteria, viruses, and fungi, can cause pneumonia. You can also get pneumonia by inhaling a liquid or chemical. People most at risk are older than 65 or younger than 2 years of age, or already have health problems.

Symptoms of pneumonia vary from mild to severe. See your doctor promptly if you

  • Have a high fever
  • Have shaking chills
  • Have a cough with phlegm that doesn't improve or gets worse
  • Develop shortness of breath with normal daily activities
  • Have chest pain when you breathe or cough
  • Feel suddenly worse after a cold or the flu

Your doctor will use your medical history, a physical exam, and lab tests to diagnose pneumonia. Treatment depends on what kind you have. If bacteria are the cause, antibiotics should help. If you have viral pneumonia, your doctor may prescribe an antiviral medicine to treat it.

Preventing pneumonia is always better than treating it. Vaccines are available to prevent pneumococcal pneumonia and the flu. Other preventive measures include washing your hands frequently and not smoking.

NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

  • Aspiration pneumonia
  • Atypical pneumonia
  • Hospital-acquired pneumonia
  • Mycoplasma pneumonia
  • Pneumonia
  • Pneumonia - adults - discharge
  • Pneumonia - children - discharge
  • Viral pneumonia

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