ICD-10 Diagnosis Code I78.0

Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia

Diagnosis Code I78.0

ICD-10: I78.0
Short Description: Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia
Long Description: Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia
This is the 2017 version of the ICD-10-CM diagnosis code I78.0

Code Classification
  • Diseases of the circulatory system
    • Diseases of arteries, arterioles and capillaries (I70-I79)
      • Diseases of capillaries (I78)

Information for Medical Professionals

Diagnostic Related Groups
The diagnosis code I78.0 is grouped in the following Diagnostic Related Group(s) (MS-DRG v33.0)


Convert to ICD-9 Additional informationCallout TooltipGeneral Equivalence Map
The ICD-10 and ICD-9 GEMs are used to facilitate linking between the diagnosis codes in ICD-9-CM and the new ICD-10-CM code set. The GEMs are the raw material from which providers, health information vendors and payers can derive specific applied mappings to meet their needs.
  • 448.0 - Heredit hemorr telangiec

  • Epistaxis
  • Hereditary benign telangiectasia
  • Hereditary dysplasia of blood vessel
  • Hereditary epistaxis
  • Osler hemorrhagic telangiectasia syndrome
  • Primary idiopathic cutaneous telangiectasia

Index of Diseases and Injuries
References found for the code I78.0 in the Index of Diseases and Injuries:

Information for Patients

Bleeding Disorders

Also called: Clotting disorders

Normally, if you get hurt, your body forms a blood clot to stop the bleeding. For blood to clot, your body needs cells called platelets and proteins known as clotting factors. If you have a bleeding disorder, you either do not have enough platelets or clotting factors or they don't work the way they should.

Bleeding disorders can be the result of other diseases, such as severe liver disease. They can also be inherited. Hemophilia is an inherited bleeding disorder. Bleeding disorders can also be a side effect of medicines.

  • Bleeding disorders
  • Bleeding time
  • Disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC)
  • Partial thromboplastin time (PTT)
  • Prothrombin time (PT)

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Vascular Diseases

The vascular system is the body's network of blood vessels. It includes the arteries, veins and capillaries that carry blood to and from the heart. Problems of the vascular system are common and can be serious. Arteries can become thick and stiff, a problem called atherosclerosis. Blood clots can clog vessels and block blood flow to the heart or brain. Weakened blood vessels can burst, causing bleeding inside the body.

You are more likely to have vascular disease as you get older. Other factors that make vascular disease more likely include

  • Family history of vascular or heart diseases
  • Pregnancy
  • Illness or injury
  • Long periods of sitting or standing still
  • Any condition that affects the heart and blood vessels, such as diabetes or high cholesterol
  • Smoking
  • Obesity

Losing weight, eating healthy foods, being active and not smoking can help vascular disease. Other treatments include medicines and surgery.

  • Aortic arch syndrome
  • Arterial embolism
  • Arteriogram
  • Cerebral angiography
  • Duplex ultrasound
  • Venous insufficiency
  • Venous ulcers -- self-care

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Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia is a disorder that results in the development of multiple abnormalities in the blood vessels.In the circulatory system, blood carrying oxygen from the lungs is normally pumped by the heart into the arteries at high pressure. The pressure allows the blood to make its way through the arteries to the smaller vessels (arterioles and capillaries) that supply oxygen to the body's tissues. By the time blood reaches the capillaries, the pressure is much lower. The blood then proceeds from the capillaries into veins, through which it eventually returns to the heart.In hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia, some arterial vessels flow directly into veins rather than into the capillaries. These abnormalities are called arteriovenous malformations. When they occur in vessels near the surface of the skin, where they are visible as red markings, they are known as telangiectases (the singular is telangiectasia).Without the normal buffer of the capillaries, the blood moves from the arteries at high pressure into the thinner walled, less elastic veins. The extra pressure tends to strain and enlarge these blood vessels, and may result in compression or irritation of adjacent tissues and frequent episodes of severe bleeding (hemorrhage). Nosebleeds are very common in people with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia, and more serious problems may arise from hemorrhages in the brain, liver, lungs, or other organs.There are several forms of hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia, distinguished mainly by their genetic cause but with some differences in patterns of signs and symptoms. People with type 1 tend to develop symptoms earlier than those with type 2, and are more likely to have blood vessel malformations in the lungs and brain. Type 2 and type 3 may be associated with a higher risk of liver involvement. Women are more likely than men to develop blood vessel malformations in the lungs with type 1, and are also at higher risk of liver involvement with both type 1 and type 2. Individuals with any form of hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia, however, can have any of these problems.Juvenile polyposis/hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia syndrome is a condition that involves both arteriovenous malformations and a tendency to develop growths (polyps) in the gastrointestinal tract. Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia types 1, 2 and 3 do not appear to increase the likelihood of such polyps.
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